Faculty

Jennifer Cole

Jennifer Cole's work addresses the substantive topics of memory and forgetting, youth and generational change, gender, sexuality and transnational kinship. Her research focuses on Africa - specifically the island of Madagascar - and the legacy of Madagascar's colonial and now post-colonial encounter with France.

Rosenwald 305D Spring Quarter Office Hours: Mondays 10:00 am-12:00 pm; sign up here - https://calendly.com/cole_chd_office_hours/20min

I am a social and cultural anthropologist whose work examines how personal change and individual development shape, and are shaped by, broader political, economic and cultural transformations: the unruly terrain where person and history meet. My research focuses on Africa -- specifically the island of Madagascar -- and the legacy of Madagascar’s colonial and now post-colonial encounter with France. As a consequence of my efforts to analyze the interplay between historical change and individual experience, my work addresses the substantive topics of memory and forgetting, youth and generational change, gender, sexuality, kinship and migration.

My first book, Forget Colonialism? Sacrifice and the Art of Memory in Madagascar (University of California Press 2001) examined the ritual practices that mediated peasants’ memories of the colonial past through which peasants in east Madagascar recollected some aspects of the colonial past while erasing others. It also analyzed how local practices centered on ancestors mediated peasants’ memories of the colonial past. The book offered a depiction of one community’s ways of dealing with a divisive colonial past and a theory of social and cultural memory. But the research presented in that book opened up a new question for me: How did young people who had never lived through French colonial rule imagine their futures?

My second book, Sex and Salvation: Imagining the Future in Madagascar (University of Chicago Press, 2010) took up this question by examining the relationship between youth and social change in urban Madagascar. I trace two competing paths that have become the hallmark of contemporary Madagascar as much of Africa: women’s entry into the sexual economy and their search for European husbands on the one hand, and their conversion to Pentecostal Christianity on the other. Against prevalent narratives of African youth severed from their past, Sex and Salvation showed how “newness comes into the world” not through rupture, but rather as an uneven blend of old and new, fuelled in part by people’s imagination of how change happens. Several co-edited volumes, including Generations and Globalization; Youth, Age, and Family in the New World Economy (Indiana 2007), Figuring the Future: Globalization and the Temporalities of Children and Youth (School of American Research 2008) and Love in Africa (Chicago 2009) have examined issues of youth and generations, love, gender and sexuality and their relation to social change in broader comparative perspective.

My current research focuses on African migration to Europe.  A co-edited volume, Affective Circuits: African Migrations to Europe and the Pursuit of Social Regeneration (Chicago 2016) develops the notion of affective circuits as a way to theorize the complex links that tie migrants to their kin back home.  A monograph in preparation, Giving Life: Malagasy women, French men and the Making of a Double Diaspora follows Malagasy women who migrate to France and marry French men. Set against a backdrop of tightening immigration laws and increased xenophobia, the book examines the role of cultural ideas of gender and kinship in migration. 

Contact Information
jcole@uchicago.edu

Courses, Students

My teaching covers a range of theoretical and substantive topics ranging from basic social theory to intensive writing practicums.  The Culture, Power, Subjectivity class is a two part sequence typically taught alternate years, which integrates basic social science theory with an empirical problem of some kind. I also teach classes on gender and postcolonialism, African mobility, and youth and generational change. My students work on wide variety of issues related to gender, youth, migration and memory.    

This year I am teaching two graduate seminars, both in Winter of 2017. “Women’s Rights, Cultural Nationalism, Moral Panics: Africa and India” (co-taught with Rochona Majumdar) interrogates questions of gender and freedom/ moral panic/ differential citizenship drawing examples from India and Africa.   “Mobility and Immobility: African Perspectives and Contemporary Migration” examines governmentality and the creation of borders, the production of immobility, and the role of kinship in migration with a focus on African experience.

Relevant Publications

Books

2010:  Sex and Salvation: Imagining the Future in Madagascar. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2001:  Forget Colonialism? Sacrifice and the Art of Memory in Madagascar. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Edited volumes

2016  Affective Circuits: African Migration to Europe and the Pursuit of Social Regeneration.  Edited with Christian Groes. Chicago, University of Chicago Press. 

2009.  Love in Africa. Edited with Lynn Thomas. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2008.  Figuring the Future: Globalization and the Temporalities of Children and Youth. Edited with Deborah Durham. Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research Press.

2007.  Generations and Globalization: Youth, Age, and Family in the New World Economy. Edited with Deborah Durham. Tracking Globalization Series, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.


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Articles

In press:  “Malagasy Migrants and the Making of a Racialized French Working Class” in African Futures: Essays on Crisis, Emergence, and Possibility. Brian Goldestone and Juan Obarrio, eds.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press

2014:  “Working Mis/understandings: The Tangled Relationship between Kinship, Franco-Malagasy Bi-National Marriage and the French State." Cultural Anthropology. Volume29(3):527-551. Producing Value among Malagasy Marriage Migrants in France Managing Horizons of Expectation

2014:  “Producing Value among Malagasy Marriage Migrants in France: Managing Horizons of Expectation” Current Anthropology. Volume 55, Supplement 9.

2014:  “The Téléphone Malgache: Gossip and Social Transformation among Malagasy marriage migrants in France" American Ethnologist Vol. 41(2): 276-289. 

2012:  "On Generations and Aging: 'Fresh Contact' of a Different Sort" in Transitions and Transformations: Cultural Perspectives on Aging and the Life Course, ed. Caitrin Lynch and Jason Danely. Pp. 220-230. Berghahn Publications: London and NY.

2012:  “The Love of Jesus Never Disappoints:  Reconstituting Female Personhood in Urban Madagascar” for the Journal of Religion in Africa, 42: 1-24.  Special issue, edited by Astrid Bochow and Rijk van Dijk.

2011:  "A Cultural Dialectics of Generational Change: The View from Africa" in Stanton Wortham and Vivian Gaddsen. Review of Research in Education. Volume 35:60-88.

2011:  "Women and Pentecostalism: The Emergence of New Urban Worlds in Madagascar" in Cultures citadines dans l'Océan Indien occidental (XVIIIe-XXI e siècles) Pluralisme, échanges, inventivité, Faranirina V. Rajaonah, ed. Pp. 385-409. Paris: Karthala.

2009:  "Lasa Modely: Representational Loops and Uneven Social Change in Tamatave, Madagascar" in Madagascar Révisitée: En Voyage Avec Françoise Raison, ed. Didier Natival et Faranirina V. Rajaonah, 521-541. Paris: Karthala.

2009:  "Love, Money and Economies of Intimacy in Tamatave Madagascar" In Love in Africa, ed. Jennifer Cole and Lynn Thomas, 109-134. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2009:  "Thinking through, Love in Africa" with Lynn Thomas. In Love in Africa, ed. Jennifer Cole and Lynn Thomas, 1-30. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2008:  "'Et Plus Si Affinités:' Malagasy Internet Marriage, Shifting Post-Colonial Hierarchies, and Policing New Boundaries" In "Emotional Latitudes: The Ambiguities of Colonial and Post-Colonial Sentiment," Special Issue of Historical Reflections/ Réflexions Historiques, Matt Matsuda and Alice Bullard (eds.) 34( 1): 26-49.

2008:  "Fashioning Distinction: Youth and Consumerism in Urban Madagascar" in Figuring the Future: Globalization and the Temporalities of Children and Youth, ed. Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham, 99-124. Santa Fe: School of American Research.

2008:  "Introduction: Globalization and the Temporality of Children and Youth" with Deborah Durham. In Figuring the Future: Globalization and the Temporalities of Children and Youth, ed. Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham, 3-23. Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research.

2007:  "Introduction: Age, Regeneration, and the Intimate Politics of Globalization" with Deborah Durham. In Generations and Globalization: Youth, Age, and Family in the New World Economy, ed. Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham, 1-28. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

2006:  "Malagasy and Western Conceptions of Memory: Implications for Post-Colonial Politics and the Study of Memory" Ethos, 34(2): 211-243. Reprinted in Russian, 2009.

2005:  "Collective Memory and the Politics of Reproduction in Africa," Introduction to a Special Issue on Collective Memory and Reproduction edited by Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg, Africa 75(1): 1-9.

2005:  "The Jaombilo of Tamatave, Madagascar," Journal of Social History, 38 (4) Special Issue on Childhood and Globalization, Peter Stearns (ed.). Summer 2005, 38(4): 891-914.

2004:  "Fresh Contact in Tamatave, Madagascar: Sex, Money and Intergenerational Transformation," American Ethnologist. 31(4):571-586. Reprinted in Generations and Globalization: Youth, Age, and Family in the New World Economy, ed. Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham, 74-101. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

2004:  "Memory and Modernity: Overcoming the Social/Individual Divide in Memory Studies," The Companion to Psychological Anthropology, ed. Conerly Casey and Robert Edgerton, 103-120. London: Blackwells. Reprinted in Russian, 2009.

2004:  "Painful Memories: Ritual and the Transformation of Community Trauma," Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 23(1): 87–105. Reprinted in Pain and Its Transformations, ed. Sarah Coakley and Kay Shelmay, 245-266. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

2003:  "Narratives and Moral Projects: Generational Memories of the Malagasy 1947 Rebellion," Ethos 31(1): 95–126.

2001:  "Rethinking Ancestors and Colonial Power in Madagascar," with Karen Middleton, Africa 71(1): 1–37.

1998:  "The Work of Memory in Madagascar," American Ethnologist 25(4): 610–633.

Full Biography
Professor and Chair, Department of Comparative Human Development; Chair, Committee on African Studies

Eman Abdelhadi

Eman Abdelhadi is a multi-method sociologist interested in religion, gender, identity, and demography. Using in-depth life history interviews, she is writing a book on how gender shapes second-generation American Muslims’ entry and exit into Muslim communities across the life course. She also uses quantitative methods to research ethno-religious and gendered cultural, political and economic outcomes.

Rosenwald 318B Spring Quarter Office Hours: Tuesdays 2:00-3:00 pm via Zoom, https://uchicago.zoom.us/j/987622784

Our society is increasingly composed of multiple subcultures—ethnic, religious and political. How do these subcultural communities reproduce themselves across generations? Why are some more successful at this than others?  My project answers these questions using the case of second-generation immigrant Muslim Americans. I trace individuals’ relationships with Muslim communities across the life course, showing the ways in which attachment is gendered at individual, household and institutional levels. 

The book speaks to my broader interest in how religion influences everyday life, including political and economic outcomes. I have investigated this question from multiple angles, sometimes using quantitative methods. One set of projects examines when, where and how religion matters for women’s participation in the public sphere through paid employment. Another set focuses on the relationship between religious orthodoxy and political conservatism in the United States.

 

Publications

2019 – The Hijab and Muslim Women’s Employment in the United StatesResearch in Social Stratification and Mobility

2018 (with Paula England) – Do Values Explain the Low Employment Levels of Muslim Women Around the World? A Within- and Between-Country Analysis. British Journal of Sociology

2017 – Religiosity and Muslim Women’s Employment in the United States. Socius

 

Full CV available here

Full Biography
Provost Postdoctoral Fellow, 2019-21; Assistant Professor, 2021-

Marisa Casillas

Marisa Casillas is a psycholinguist interested in exploring how cognitive and social processes shape the ways in which people learn, perceive, and produce language (particularly the language of everyday conversations). She uses a combination of experimental- and observation-based methods to investigate these themes in multiple ethnolinguistic settings.

Spring Quarter Office Hours: Wednesdays and Fridays 8:00-11:00 am via Zoom, https://uchicago.zoom.us/j/919737709

Broadly speaking, I am interested in exploring how cognitive and social processes shape the ways in which we learn, perceive, and produce language. My primary research examines the relationship between communicative skills and linguistic processing in children and adults. I use a combination of experimental- and observation-based methods to investigate these processes.

Much of my work focuses in particular on how communicative and linguistic skills co-develop during in the first few years of life with the hope of better understanding how our capacity to produce, understand, and transmit language across generations is shaped by interactive needs.

I am currently a post-doctoral researcher working in the Language Development Department at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. My current project, funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) compares how children's early interactive experience influences their communicative development in two rural indigenous communities, one in Papua New Guinea and the other in Southern Mexico.

I will join the department of Comparative Human Development as an assistant professor in January 2021.

https://www.mpi.nl/people/casillas-marisa

Full Biography
Visiting Assistant Professor (Spring 2020) Assistant Professor (starting January 2021)

Michele Friedner

Michele Friedner is a social and medical anthropologist whose work examines both the category of and experience of “deafness” and “disability,” particularly in urban India. She is interested in how political economic changes in India have created new opportunities and constraints for deaf and disabled people in the arenas of employment, education, politics, religion, and everyday life.

Rosenwald 318I Spring Quarter Office Hours: Wednesdays 3:00-5:00 pm; sign up here - http://www.calendly.com/michelefriedner.

I am a social and medical anthropologist whose work examines both the category of and experience of “deafness” and “disability,” particularly in urban India. I am interested in how political economic changes in India have created new opportunities and constraints for deaf and disabled people in the arenas of employment, education, politics, religion, and everyday life. In working with sign language-using deaf people, I also attend to the limits of disability as both a juridical and legislative category and as an explanatory concept within social theory. Disability has become a global category and is fixed in international documents and treaties such as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). How do such framings shape deaf and disabled people’s attempts to attain recognition, live inhabitable lives, and create futures?

My 2015 book Valuing Deaf Worlds in Urban India (Rutgers University Press) analyzes how sign language-using young adults in urban India work toward “deaf development,” or futures in which deaf social, moral, and economic practices are foregrounded. These practices – both actual and projected – include teaching and helping other deaf people, sharing news and information, and creating deaf institutions such as schools, businesses, and old-age homes. As educational and livelihood opportunities for deaf people change in contemporary urban India, deaf young adults have begun to circulate through novel spaces, including vocational training centers, information technology offices, pyramid scheme recruitment sessions, and Christian churches and fellowships. In contrast to the majority of academic work on disability, which analyzes the experiences of disabled people through the lens of stigma or deprivation, the book analyzes how deafness and disability enable new regimes of value to emerge for deaf people themselves, NGOs, corporations and other employers, and the state.

 

I have three current research projects at various stages of development. The first project, for which I have received a 2017-2018 American Institute of Indian Studies Senior Short-term Fellowship, is titled “Disability, Diversity, and Affirmative Action in urban India.” In this project, I analyze how the category of disability interacts with other categories of differentiation in modern India, specifically on central university campuses in New Delhi, India. The aim is to examine how students from different (disability and lower-caste and tribal backgrounds) interact to perform “unity in diversity,” India’s first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s famous phrase. In tracking these interactions, the project broadly interrogates the work that the category of disability does in modern India and explores how disability claims are exerted in the context of affirmative action. How do disability-based discourses around affirmative action differ from and intersect those made based upon caste and tribe?

My second project in collaboration with Stephanie Lloyd, is funded by a Canadian Social Science and Humanities Research Council start grant, and is titled “When Deaf People Hear: A Study at the Intersection of Neuroplasticity, Technological Interventions, and Experiences in the Grey Zone of Deaf and Hearing.” Our goal through this pilot, and later full-fledged project, is to provide new understandings of what it means for deaf people to hear, and ultimately, to develop a new genealogy of deafness that can and does include hearing. In the process, we will create bridges between traditionally estranged disciplines such as deaf studies on the one hand and researchers focused on cochlear implantation on the other. This project has important stakes in that it provides an ethnographic examination of the effects and affects of bionic technologies that are becoming a norm.

This second project feeds into a third project which examines cochlear implantation in India and the ways that implantation is becoming a state-funded norm. In examining who gets implanted and why as well as the after-effects of implantation, I am interested in exploring what deaf futures in India might look like and how providing free implants to children of families living below the poverty line functions as a form of social, political, and economic (re)distribution. In particular, the project explores cochlear implantation in the South Indian state of Kerala which has traditionally been considered a leader in social and educational programs.

 

I am committed to the emerging disciplines of deaf studies and disability studies and to finding ways to place these disciplines in conversation with anthropology: I have co-edited a book titled “It’s a small world: International deaf spaces and encounters” (Gallaudet University Press) that features twenty five chapters written by scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds that explores international deaf similitude, development initiatives, and encounters; in this book, we critically interrogate the phrase frequently uttered in deaf worlds: “DEAF DEAF SAME.” In addition, I co-edited a Somatosphere: Science, Medicine, and Anthropology series titled “Inhabitable Worlds” which features ethnographic and theoretical interventions into how we think about ability, disability, and debility. I am on the editorial board of Disability Studies Quarterly, on the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Disability Research Interest Group Steering Committee, and I am an advisor on the European Research Council-funded project Mobile Deaf, a deaf-run research project based at Heriot Watt University analyzing deaf peoples’ translanguaging in various empirical contexts.

 

 Courses

In the 2017-2018 academic year, I am teaching an undergraduate course in the winter quarter: Disability in Local and Global Contexts, and a graduate course in the spring quarter: Disability, Vulnerability, and (Inter)dependency. I will also teach in the undergraduate core in Self, Culture, and Society in the winter quarter.

Selected Publications:

Books

2015 Valuing Deaf Worlds in India (Rutgers University Press).

2015 It’s a small world: International Deaf Spaces and Encounters. (edited with Annelies Kusters) (Gallaudet University Press).

Refereed Articles

2016 Not-Understanding and Understanding: What do Epistemologies and Ontologies Do in Deaf Worlds? Sign Language Studies. 16(2):184-203.

2015 New disability mobilities and accessibilities in urban India. (with Jamie Osborne). City & Society. 27(1):9-29.

2015 Deaf Bodies and Corporate Bodies: New Regimes of Value in Bangalore’s Business Process Outsourcing Sector. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. 21(2):313-329.

2015 On “diversity” and “inclusion”: Exploring paradigms for achieving Sign Language Peoples’ rights. With Annelies Kusters, Maartje De Meulder, and Steve Emery. Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity Working Paper. (Translated into German by Das Zeichen).

2015 Deaf Uplines and Downlines: Multi-level Marketing, Fractures, and the Coerciveness of Sociality in urban India. Contributions to Indian Sociology. 44(1-2):103-128

2014 Deaf Capital: An exploration of the relationship between stigma and value in deaf multi-level marketing participation in urban India. Medical Anthropology Quarterly. 28(4):202-218.

2014 On the limits and possibilities of “DEAF DEAF SAME:” Ethnographic Perspectives from Adamarobe (Ghana) and Bangalore and Delhi (India). (with Annelies Kusters). Disability Studies Quarterly. 34(3).

2014 The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Church-Going Practices and “Sign Bread and Butter” in Bangalore, India. Anthropology and Education Quarterly. 45:39-53.

2013 Producing “Workers with Disabilities”: Deaf Workers and Added Value in India’s Coffee Shops. Anthropology of Work Review. 34(1): 39-50.

2013 Audit Bodies: Embodied Participation, Disability Universalism, and Accessibility in India. (with Jamie Osborne). Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography.  45(1): 43-60.

2012 Sound Studies Meets Deaf Studies. (with Stefan Helmreich). The Senses & Society. 7(1): 72-86. (Reprinted in Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond by Stefan Helmreich).

2010 Bio-Power, Biosociality, and Community Formation: How Bio-Power is Constitutive of the Deaf Community. Sign Language Studies. 10(3): 336-347.

Chapters in Edited Books

Forthcoming The Spoiled and the Salvaged: Modulations of Auditory Value in Bangalore, India and Bangkok, Thailand. (with Benjamin Tausig). In Sykes, Jim and Steingo, Gavin, eds. Remapping Sound Studies in the Global South. Duke University Press.

2017 Doing Deaf Studies in the Global South. In Kusters, Annelies, DeMeulder Maartje, and O’Brien, Dai, eds. Innovations in Deaf Studies: The Role of Deaf Scholars. Oxford University Press.

2016 Occupying Seats, Occupying Space, Occupying Time: Deaf Young Adults in Vocational Training Centers in Bangalore, India. In Block, Pam et al., eds.  Occupying Disability: Decolonizing Identity, Community and Justice. New York: Springer Publishers. Pgs 209-223.

2013 Identity Formation and Transnational Discourses: Thinking Beyond Identity Politics. In Addlakha, Renu, ed. Disability Studies in India: Global Discourses, Lived Realities. New Delhi: Routledge India. 241-262.    

Full Biography
Assistant Professor

Susan Goldin-Meadow

Susan Goldin-Meadow is the Beardsley Ruml Distinguished Service Professor. Her work explores language creation in deaf children in the US, China, Turkey and, most recently, Nicaragua, and also the impact that our bodies––in particular, the gestures we produce when we talk––have on thinking and learning.  She is co-director of the new Center for Gesture, Sign and Language at the University.

On leave 2019-20.

Rosenwald 318F | Green 408

I received my Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. I am the founding and current Editor of Language Learning and Development, former Associate Editor of Developmental Psychology and Applied Psycholinguistics, and current Associate Editor of Cognitive Science and Gesture. I was President of the Cognitive Development Society and am currently President of the International Society for Gesture Studies, a member of the Board of Directors for the Association for Psychological Science, and secretary of the Society for Research in Child Development. I served on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders at NIH and was elected to the American Academy for Arts and Sciences in 2005.

Contact Information
sgm@uchicago.edu 
http://goldin-meadow-lab.uchicago.edu/

Research Description

A year spent at the Piagetian Institute in Geneva while an undergraduate at Smith College piqued my interest in the relation between language and thought, interests I continued to pursue in my doctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania. At Penn and in collaboration with Lila Gleitman and Heidi Feldman, I began my studies exploring whether children who lack a (usable) model for language can nevertheless create a language with their hands. We have found that deaf children whose profound hearing losses prevent them from learning the speech that surrounds them, and whose hearing parents have not exposed them to sign, invent gesture systems which are structured in language-like ways. We are currently studying these so-called homesign gesture systems around the globe. This interest in how the manual modality can serve the needs of communication and thinking led to my work on the gestures that accompany speech in hearing individuals. We have found that gesture can convey substantive information –– information that is often not expressed in the speech it accompanies. Gesture can thus reveal secrets of the mind to those who pay attention. Moreover, we are currently exploring the ways in which gesture goes beyond revealing speakers’ thoughts to play a role in changing those thoughts.

Courses

Introduction to Language Development, Communicative Uses of Nonverbal Behavior

Publications

Goldin-Meadow, S. The resilience of language: What gesture creation in deaf children can tell us about how all children learn language. N.Y.: Psychology Press, 2003.

Goldin-Meadow, S. Hearing gesture: How our hands help us think. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, 2003.

Gentner, D., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (eds.). Language in mind: Advances in the study of language and thought. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003.

Iverson, J.M., & Goldin-Meadow, S. Gesture paves the way for language development. Psychological Science, 2005, 16, 367-371.

Goldin-Meadow, S. & Wagner, S. M. How our hands help us learn. Trends in Cognitive Science, 2005, 9, 234-241.

Goldin-Meadow, S., Mylander, C., & Franklin, A. How children make language out of gesture: Morphological structure in gesture systems developed by American and Chinese deaf children. Cognitive Psychology, 2007, 55, 87-135.

Goldin-Meadow, S., So, W.-C., Ozyurek, A., & Mylander, C. The natural order of events: How speakers of different languages represent events nonverbally. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2008, 105(27), 9163-9168.

Goldin-Meadow, S., Cook, S. W., & Mitchell, Z. A. Gesturing gives children new ideas about math. Psychological Science, in press.

Rowe, M.L., & Goldin-Meadow, S. Differences in early gesture explain SES disparities in child vocabulary size at school entry. Science, in press.

Full Biography
Beardsley Ruml Distinguished Service Professor

Sydney Hans

Sydney Hans is a Professor at the School of Social Service Administration. Her research seeks to understand how biological and social factors interact in contributing to risk and resilience in human development.

SSA E6

Sydney Hans is a Professor at the School of Social Service Administration. Her research seeks to understand how biological and social factors interact in contributing to risk and resilience in human development. She studies how experiences in early life, particularly the relationship between mother and infant, influence development at later ages. She has conducted studies focusing on the development of young children whose parents use illicit substances, suffer from major mental disorders, have experienced traumatic events, and/or live in conditions of extreme poverty. She is particularly interested in using research to develop interventions and public policy that will benefit infants, young children, and their families. She currently is engaged in implementing and evaluating intervention programs in which paraprofessional "doulas" provide childbirth education and support to adolescent mothers. Professor Hans' research has been supported by a variety of private foundations and public agencies, including the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. She is currently serving as an associate editor of Developmental Psychology and on the editorial board of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

Professor Hans graduated with a B.S. in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University and received her Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Relations from Harvard University.

Contact Information
s-hans@uchicago.edu

Doctoral courses

Development through the Life Course (SSA 50400)

Sample publications

Hans, S. L., & Thullen, M. J. (in press). The relational context of adolescent motherhood. In C. Zeanah (Ed.), Handbook of infant mental health, 3rd edition. New York: Guilford Press.

Sokolowski, M. S., Hans, S. L., Bernstein, V. J., & Cox, S. (2007). Mothers’ representations of their infants and parenting behavior: Associations with personal and social-contextual variables in a high-risk sample. Infant Mental Health Journal, 28, 344-365.

Hans, S. L. (2002). Studies of prenatal exposure to drugs: Focusing on parental care of children. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 24, 329-337.

Hans, S. L., Auerbach, J. G., Auerbach, A. G., & Marcus, J. (2005). Development from birth to adolescence of children at risk for schizophrenia. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 15, 384-394.

Hans, S. L. (2006). Mothering and depression. In S. E. Romans & M. V. Seeman (Eds.), Women’s mental health (pp. 311-320). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Full Biography
Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor; Deputy Dean for Research and Faculty Development at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Guanglei Hong

Guanglei Hong has focused her research on developing causal inference theories and methods for evaluating educational and social policies and programs in multi-level, longitudinal settings.

Rosenwald 325A

Guanglei Hong obtained a Master's degree in Statistics and a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Michigan in 2004. She is a member of the Committee on Education at the University of Chicago. Before joining the University of Chicago faculty in July 2009, she had been an Assistant Professor in the Human Development and Applied Psychology Department in the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.

Research

She has focused her research on developing causal inference theories and methods for evaluating educational and social policies and programs in multi-level, longitudinal settings. Her work addresses issues including (1) how to conceptualize and evaluate the causal effects of treatments when individual responses to alternative treatments depend on various features of the organizational settings, (2) how to adjust for selection bias in estimating the effects of concurrent multi-valued treatments, (3) how to evaluate the cumulative effects of time-varying treatments, and (4) how to conceptualize and analyze the causal mediation mechanisms.

Because advancements in these quantitative research methods are best illustrated and utilized through empirical investigations of prominent scientific issues, she communicates with a broad audience through applying the causal inference methods to studies of specific policies and practices in education and beyond.

Her research has received support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Spencer Foundation, the National Academy of Education, the American Educational Research Association Grants Program, the William T. Grant Foundation, and the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences among other sources of funding. She has been elected to serve on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Educational and Behavioral StatisticsEducational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, and Effective Education. She served as the Guest Editor for the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness special issue on the statistical approaches to studying mediator effects in education research in 2012.

Teaching

She teaches quantitative methods courses including Applied Statistics in Human Development Research, Causal Inference, and Mediation, Moderation, and Spillover Effects.

Contact Information
ghong@uchicago.edu
Personal website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/ghong/

Publications (selective)

Book

Hong, G. (2015). Causality in a social world: Moderation, mediation, and spill-over. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Articles

Hong, G., Deutsch, J., & Hill, H. D. (in press). Ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting for causal mediation analysis in the presence of treatment-by-mediator interaction. Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics.

Qin, X., & Hong, G. (2014). Causal mediation analysis in multi-site trials: An application of ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting to the Head Start Impact Study. In JSM Proceedings, Social Statistics Section. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association, pp.912-926.

VanderWeele, T., Hong, G., Jones, S., & Brown, J. (2013). Mediation and spillover effects in group-randomized trials: A case study of the 4R’s educational intervention. Journal of the American Statistical Association108(502), 469-482.

Hong, G., Raudenbush, S. W. (2013). Heterogeneous agents, social interactions, and causal inference. In the Handbook of Causal Analysis for Social Research (pp.331-352) edited by Stephen L. Morgan. NY: Springer.

Hong, G. (2013). Covariate-informed parallel design: Discussion of “experimental designs for identifying causal mechanisms” by Imai, Tingley, and Yamamoto. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Serial A, 176, 35.

Hong, G., & Nomi, T. (2012). Weighting methods for assessing policy effects mediated by peer change. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness special issue on the statistical approaches to studying mediator effects in education research, 5(3), 261-289.

Hong, G., & Nomi, T. (2012). Rejoinder. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness special issue on the statistical approaches to studying mediator effects in education research, 5(3), 299-302.

Hong, G. (2012). Editorial comments. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness special issue on the statistical approaches to studying mediator effects in education research, 5(3), 213-214.

Hong, G. (2012). Marginal mean weighting through stratification: A generalized method for evaluating multi-valued and multiple treatments with non-experimental data. Psychological Methods, 17(1), 44-60.

Hong, G., Corter, C., Hong, Y., & Pelletier, J. (2012). Differential effects of literacy instruction time and homogeneous grouping in kindergarten: Who will benefit? Who will suffer? Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 34(1), 69-88.

Hong, G., Nomi, T., & Yu, B. (2012). Prognostic score-based difference-in-differences. In JSM Proceedings, Social Statistics Section. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association, 4952-4966.

Hong, G., Deutsch, J., & Hill, H. (2011). Parametric and non-parametric weighting methods for estimating mediation effects: An application to the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies. In JSM Proceedings, Social Statistics Section. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association, 3215-3229.

Hong, G. (2010). Marginal mean weighting through stratification: Adjustment for selection bias in multilevel data. Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, 35(5), 499-531.

Chen-Bumgardner, X., Xu, F., Kim, N., Hong, G., Wang, Y. (2010). Effects of cross-language transfer on first language phonological awareness and literacy skills in Chinese children receiving English instruction. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(3), 712-728.

Hong, G. (2010). Ratio of mediator probability weighting for estimating natural direct and indirect effects. In JSM ProceedingsBiometrics Section, Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association. 2401-2415.

Hong, G., & Hong, Y. (2009). Reading instruction time and homogeneous grouping in kindergarten: An application of marginal mean weighting through stratification. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 31(1), 54-81.

Hong, G., & Raudenbush, S. W. (2008) Causal inference for time-varying instructional treatments. Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, 33(3), 333-362.

Hong, G., & Yu, B. (2008). Effects of kindergarten retention on children’s social-emotional development: An application of propensity score method to multivariate multi-level data. Special Section on New Methods in Developmental Psychology, 44(2), 407-421.

Hong, G., & Yu, B. (2007). Early grade retention and children’s reading and math learning in elementary years. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 29(4), 239-261.

Hong, G., & Raudenbush, S. W. (2006). Evaluating kindergarten retention policy: A case study of causal inference for multi-level observational data. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 101(475), 901-910.

Hong, G., & Raudenbush, S. W. (2005). Effects of kindergarten retention policy on children's cognitive growth in reading and mathematics. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 27(3), 205-224.

Hong, G., & Raudenbush, S. W. (2003). “Causal inference for multi-level observational data with application to kindergarten retention study." In JSM 2003 ProceedingsSocial Statistics Section, Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association. 1849-1856.

Awards

William T. Grant Scholar, William T. Grant Foundation, 2009-2014

NAE/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Academy of Education and Spencer Foundation, 2006-2007

AERA Mary Catherine Ellwein Outstanding Dissertation Award – Measurement and Quantitative Research Methodology, American Educational Research Association, Division D, 2005

Spencer Dissertation Fellowship for Research Related to Education, Spencer Foundation, 2003-2004

Joint Statistical Meetings Student Paper Competition Award, American Statistical Association, 2003

AERA Dissertation Grant, American Educational Research Association, 2002-2003

Full Biography
Professor, Comparative Human Development; Chair, Committee on Quantitative Methods in Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences; Committee on Education

Micere Keels

Micere Keels examines how racial-ethnic inequalities in neighborhood, school, and family contexts are associated with unequal educational outcomes.

Rosenwald 318J Spring Quarter Office Hours: By Appointment

Her research focuses on understanding how sociodemographic characteristics (race-ethnicity and poverty, in particular) structure the supports and challenges that individuals experience. She is particularly invested in systems-change interventions. 

Trauma Responsive Educational Practices Project                       

Keels, M. 2016. A Whole School Approach to Improving the Outcomes of Children Living in High Crime Communities. Prepared for Urban America Forward: Civil Rights Roundtable Series.

Advancing Inclusion

Keels, M. (2020). Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students’ Search for Community at Historically White Universities. Cornell University Press.

Selected Publications

Offidani-Bertrand, C., Velez, G., Benz, C. & Keels, M. (2020). “I wasn’t expecting it”: High School Experiences and Navigating Belonging in the Transition to College. Emerging Adulthood.

Durkee, M. I., Gazley, E., Hope, E. C. & Keels, M. (2019) Cultural Invalidations: Deconstructing the "Acting White" Phenomenon among Black & Latinx College Students. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

Hope, E. C., Velez, G., Offidani-Bertrand, C., Keels, M., & Durkee, M. I. (2017). Political Activism and Mental Health Among Black and Latinx College Students. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 24(1), 26.

Keels, M., Durkee, M., & Hope, E. (2017). The Psychological and Academic Costs of School-Based Racial and Ethnic Microaggressions. American Educational Research Journal, 54(6), 1316-1344.

Hope, E. C., Keels, M., & Durkee, M. I. (2016). Participation in Black Lives Matter and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals: Modern Activism Among Black and Latino College Students. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 9(3), 203-215.

Ghee, M., Keels, M., Collins, D., Spence, C. N., & Baker, E. (2016). Fine-Tuning Summer Research Programs to Promote Underrepresented Students' Persistence in STEM PathwayCBE - Life Sciences Education.

Keels, M. & Rusin, S. (2016). Perceptions May Matter Most: A Comparative Examination of Teachers’ Perceptions of “Undocumented” Latino Students in Two High Schools. In. Jones B., & Rolle, A. (Eds.) Leading Schools in Challenging Times: Eye to the Future. Information Age Publishing.

Keels, M., Burdick-Will, J., Keen, S., (2013). The Effects of Gentrification on Neighborhood Public SchoolsCity & Community.12(3), 238-259

Keels, M. (2013). The Importance of Scaffolding the Transition: Unpacking the Null Effects of Relocating Poor Children into Nonpoor NeighborhoodsAmerican Educational Research Journal50(5), 991-1018.

Keels, M. (2013). Getting Them Enrolled is Only Half the Battle: College Success at the Intersection of Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and ClassAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 83(2pt3), 310-322.

Burdick-Will, J., Keels, M., & Schuble, T. (2013). Closing and Opening Schools: Neighborhood Characteristics and the Location of New Educational Opportunities in a Large Urban DistrictJournal of Urban Affairs.

DeLuca, S., Duncan, G., Keels, M., &  Mendenhall, R. (2012). The Notable and the Null: Using Mixed Methods to Understand the Diverse Impacts of Residential Mobility Programs. In. Ham, M van, Manley D, Bailey N, Simpson L & Maclennan D (Eds). Neighbourhood Effects Research: New Perspectives. Dordrecht: Springer.

DeLuca, S., Duncan, G., Keels, M., &  Mendenhall, R. 2010. Gautreaux Mothers and Their Children: An UpdateHousing Policy Debate. 20, 7-25.

Keels, M. 2009. Ethnic Group Differences in Early Head Start Parents’ Parenting Beliefs and Practices and the Link to Children's Early Cognitive DevelopmentEarly Childhood Research Quarterly, 24(4), 381-397.

Keels, M. & Raver, C. C. 2009. Early Learning Experiences and Outcomes for Children of U.S. Immigrant Families: Introduction to the Special IssueEarly Childhood Research Quarterly, 24(4), 363-366.

Keels, M. 2008. Neighborhood Effects Examined Through the Lens of Residential Mobility ProgramsAmerican Journal of Community Psychology. 42(3-4), 235-250.

Keels, M. 2008. Residential Attainment of Now-Adult Gautreaux Children: Do They Gain, Hold, or Lose Ground in Neighborhood Ethnic and Economic SegregationHousing Studies. 23(4), 541-564.

Keels, M. 2008. Second-Generation Effects of Chicago’s Gautreaux Residential Mobility Program on Children's Participation in CrimeJournal of Research on Adolescence. 18(2), 305-352.

Keels, M., G. Duncan, R. Mendenhall, S. Deluca, & J. Rosenbaum. 2005. Fifteen Years Later: Can Residential Mobility Programs Provide a Permanent Escape from Neighborhood Segregation, Crime, and Poverty? Demography, 42, 51-73.

Full Biography
Associate Professor

Susan Levine

Susan Levine is co-director of the Center for Early Childhood Research and serves as the chair of the Psychology Department. She directs the Cognitive Development Lab. Her research interests include cognitive development, development and plasticity of spatial skills, early quantitative development, and language development and functional plasticity in children with early brain injuries.

Read more about Susan Levine on her Department of Psychology profile page.

Green 401

Susan Levine is co-director of the Center for Early Childhood Research and serves as the chair of the Psychology Department. She directs the Cognitive Development Lab. Her research interests include cognitive development, development and plasticity of spatial skills, early quantitative development, and language development and functional plasticity in children with early brain injuries.

Read more about Susan Levine on her Department of Psychology profile page.

Full Biography
Rebecca Anne Boylan Professor in Education and Society

Dario Maestripieri

Dario Maestripieri is a Professor in Comparative Human Development and is also affiliated with the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge. 

His current main interests are, a) evolution of human behavior and its biological regulation, b) 20th century European literature.

Rosenwald 318D

Dario Maestripieri is a Professor in Comparative Human Development and is also affiliated with the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge. 

His current main interests are, a) evolution of human behavior and its biological regulation, b) 20th century European literature.

Contact Information
dario@uchicago.edu 
For further information, please visit these websites:
Personal website:  http://primate.uchicago.edu/dario-maestripieri.html
Lab website: http://primate.uchicago.edu

Full Biography
Professor

Jill Mateo

Jill Mateo is an Associate Professor, as well as the Committee on Evolutionary Biology, the Institute for Mind and Biology and the College.

She and her students study developmental and biological mechanisms of adaptive behaviors that enhance survival and reproduction in species-typical environments. In particular, they investigate the reciprocal interactions among social, hormonal and genetic processes and how they differentially affect behavior depending on ecological and social contexts. They use comparative approaches in the field, in the lab and in other settings, studying human and non-human primates, other mammals (e.g. lions, dolphins, and ground-dwelling squirrels) and birds.

Rosenwald 305A Spring Quarter Office Hours: By Appointment

Professor Mateo is an Associate Professor, as well as the Committee on Evolutionary Biology, the Institute for Mind and Biology and the College. She received her doctorate in the field of Biopsychology, Evolution of Animal Behavior from the University of Michigan in 1995. Dr. Mateo was a Research Associate with the Department of Psychology at Cornell University (1996-2002).

She and her students study developmental and biological mechanisms of adaptive behaviors that enhance survival and reproduction in species-typical environments. In particular, they investigate the reciprocal interactions among social, hormonal and genetic processes and how they differentially affect behavior depending on ecological and social contexts. They use comparative approaches in the field, in the lab and in other settings, studying human and non-human primates, other mammals (e.g. lions, dolphins, and ground-dwelling squirrels) and birds.

Prof. Mateo uses an epigenetic approach to development, in which ontogeny is viewed as a series of interactions between an organism and its environment (sensu Gottlieb’s probabilistic epigenesis). She also views development as a series of ontogenetic adaptations, with each stage functionally complete for that period of development and contributing to later stages. These two approaches (epigenetic and adaptive) to the study of development are complementary rather than competitive, however, as their interpretations focus on different levels of analysis. That is, proximately, what experiential factors influence the development of traits, and ultimately, are the behaviors exhibited at each stage of development adaptive (contributing to survival) for that stage? Indeed, young experience very different selective pressures than do adults, and thus what is (dys)functional for one age group may not be for another.

Most of Prof. Mateo’s research focuses on Belding's ground squirrels (Urocitellus beldingi), a highly social species found in mountainous areas of the western US. For example, she has studied the mechanisms of two functional behaviors: learning and anti-predator strategies (especially the role of stress on acquisition and modification of these behaviors) and recognition of kin (including the genetics of mate choice and the 'armpit effect'). Although the adaptive significance of these behaviors has been demonstrated, how they develop in young animals is usually unknown.

Contact Information
jmateo@uchicago.edu 
Lab website: http://mateolab.uchicago.edu

Courses

Undergraduate: Mind, Animal Behavior, Darwinian Health

Graduate: Behavioral Ecology, Biopsychology of Sex Differences, Kinship and Social Systems, Research Seminar in Animal Behavior

Relevant Publications

Coffin, H.R., Watters, J.V. & Mateo, J.M. In press. Odour-based recognition of familiar and related conspecifics in Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti). PLoS One.

Mattarella-Micke, A., Mateo, J.M., Kozak, M.N., Foster, K. & Beilock, S.L. 2011. Choke or thrive? The relation between salivary cortisol and math Performance depends on individual differences in working memory and math anxiety. Emotion, 11, 1000-1005.

Mateo, J.M. 2010. Self-referent phenotype matching and long-term maintenance of kin recognition. Animal Behaviour, 80, 929-935.

Mateo, J.M. 2010. Alarm calls elicit predator specific physiological responses. Biology Letters, 6, 623-625.

Blumstein, D.T., Ebensperger, L.A., Hayes, L.D., Vasquex, R.A., Ahern, T.H., Burger, J.R., Dolezal, A.G., Dosmann, A., Gonazalez-Mariscal, G., Harris, B.N., Herrera, E.A., Lacey, E.A., Mateo, J.M., McGraw, L.A., Olazabal, D., Ramenofsky, M., Rubenstein, D.R., Sakhai, S.A., Saltzman, W., Sainz-Borgo, C., Soto-Gamboa, M., Stewart, M.L., Wey, T.W., Wingfield, J.C., & Young, L.J. 2010. Towards an integrative understanding of social behavior: new models and new opportunities. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 4, 1-9.

Bruck, J.N. & Mateo, J.M. 2010. How habitat features shape ground squirrel navigation. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 124, 176-186.

Mateo, J.M. 2009. The causal role of odours in the development of recognition templates and social preferences. Animal Behaviour, 77, 115-121.

Maestripieri, D. & Mateo, J.M. (Eds.) 2009. Maternal Effects in Mammals. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Reyes, T.L. & Mateo, J.M. 2008. Oxytocin and cooperation: cooperation with non-kin associated with mechanisms for affiliation. The Journal of Social, Evolutionary & Cultural Psychology, 2, 234-246.

Mateo, J.M. 2008. Inverted-U shape relationship between cortisol and learning in ground squirrels. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 89, 582-590.

Mateo, J.M. 2008. Kinship signals in animals. In: Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. (Editor-in- Chief, L. R. Squire et al.). Oxford: Academic Press.

Mateo, J.M. 2007. Ecological and hormonal correlates of anti-predator behavior in Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 62, 37-49.

Mateo, J.M. 2007. Ontogeny of adaptive behaviors. In: Rodent Societies (Ed. by J.O. Wolff & P.W. Sherman), pp. 195-206. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Ables, E.A., Kay, L.M. & Mateo, J.M. 2007. Rats assess degree of relatedness from human odors. Physiology & Behavior, 90, 726-732.

Mateo, J.M. 2006. Developmental and geographic variation in stress hormones in wild Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi). Hormones and Behavior, 50, 718-725.

Mateo, J.M. 2006. Development of individually distinct recognition cues. Developmental Psychobiology, 48, 508-519.

Mateo, J.M. 2006. The nature and representation of individual recognition cues in Belding's ground squirrels. Animal Behaviour, 71, 141-154.

Mateo, J.M. & Cavigelli, S.A. 2005. A validation of extraction methods for non-invasive sampling of glucocorticoids in free-living ground squirrels. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 78, 1069-1084.

Mateo, J.M. 2004. Recognition systems and biological organization: The perception component of social recognition. Annales Zoologici Fennici, 41, 729-745.

Mateo, J.M. & Holmes, W.G. 2004. Cross-fostering as a means to study kin recognition. Animal Behaviour, 68, 1451-1459.

Mateo, J.M. 2003. Kin recognition ground squirrels and other rodents. Journal of Mammalogy, 84, 1163-1181.

Mateo, J.M. 2002. Kin recognition abilities and nepotism as a function of sociality. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, 269, 721-727.

Mateo, J.M. & Johnston, R.E. 2000. Kin recognition and the 'armpit effect': Evidence of self-referent phenotype matching. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, 267, 695-700.

Mateo, J.M. & Johnston, R.E. 2000. Retention of social recognition after hibernation in Belding's ground squirrels. Animal Behaviour, 59, 491-499.

Mateo, J.M. & Holmes, W.G. 1997. Development of alarm-call response behaviour in juvenile Belding's ground squirrels: The role of dams. Animal Behaviour, 54, 509-524.

Mateo, J.M. 1996. The development of alarm-call response behaviour in free-living juvenile Belding's ground squirrels. Animal Behaviour, 52, 489-505

Full Biography
Associate Professor Director of Undergraduate Studies Co-chair, Education and Society

Eugene Raikhel

Eugene Raikhel is a cultural and medical anthropologist with interests encompassing the anthropology of science, biomedicine and psychiatry; addiction and its treatment; suggestion and healing; and post-socialist transformations in Eurasia.

Rosenwald 318C Spring Quarter Office Hours: sign up at https://calendly.com/eraikhel

I am a cultural and medical anthropologist with interests encompassing the anthropology of science, biomedicine and psychiatry; addiction and its treatment; suggestion and healing; and post-socialist transformations in Eurasia. I am particularly concerned with the circulation of new forms of knowledge and clinical intervention produced by biomedicine, neuroscience and psychiatry. My work follows therapeutic technologies as they move both from "bench to bedside" and from one cultural or institutional setting to another, examining how they intersect with the lives of practitioners and patients.

My book Governing Habits: Treating Alcoholism in the Post-Soviet Clinic was published by Cornell University Press in the Fall of 2016. Based on fourteen months of fieldwork in St. Petersburg among institutions dealing with substance abuse, this book examines the political-economic, epidemiological and clinical changes that have transformed the knowledge and medical management of alcoholism and addiction in Russia over the past twenty years. 

Two new projects, both based largely in North America, are in an earlier stage of development. The first of these, a collaboration with Stephanie Lloyd (Laval University) and researchers in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, examines the emerging field of "behavioral epigenetics," with a particular focus on research about suicidal risk. We are in the process of carrying out an ethnographic study to examine how neuroscientists, geneticists and psychiatrists draw upon the latest scientific knowledge to explain suicide, and how family members, in turn, take up these explanations. I have also begun a second project, which will examine how contemporary logics, practices and politics of mental health and illness intersect with class distinctions and aspirations for upward mobility among undergraduates in the United States.

From September 2007 to February 2010 I held a postdoctoral fellowship in the CIHR Strategic Training Program in Culture and Mental Health Services Research in the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

I also founded, edit and frequently contribute to Somatosphere, a collaborative academic weblog focused on medical anthropology at its intersections with cultural psychiatry, bioethics and science and technology studies.

Contact Information

eraikhel@uchicago.edu

Teaching

I teach a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on the anthropology of medicine, psychiatry, mental illness, and subjectivity.  Previous versions of my course syllabi are available below.

Please use this form to sign up for office hours or contact me if you cannot make any of the available time-slots. Office hours are held in Rosenwald 318C (1101 S. 58th Street).

Courses

Culture, mental health and psychiatry

Illness and subjectivity

Medical anthropology

Disordered states

Selected publications

Eugene Raikhel. Governing Habits: Treating Alcoholism in the Post-Soviet Clinic Cornell University Press, 2016.

Eugene Raikhel and Dörte Bemme. "Post-socialism, the Psy-ences and Mental Health." Transcultural Psychiatry, 53(2): 151-175, 2016. DOI: 10.1177/1363461516635534

Eugene Raikhel. “From the Brain Disease Model to Ecologies of Addiction,” In  Revisioning Psychiatry: Cultural Phenomenology, Critical Neuroscience, and Global Mental Health. Laurence Kirmayer, Robert Lemelson and Constance Cummings eds. Cambridge University Press, 2015. DOI: 10.1017/CBO9781139424745.018

William Garriott and Eugene Raikhel. "Addiction in the Making,Annual Review of Anthropology, 44:477-491, 2015. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-anthro-102214-014242

Eugene Raikhel. "Reflex/Рефлекс.Somatosphere: Commonplaces, February 11, 2014.

Stephanie Lloyd and Eugene Raikhel. "L’épigénétique environnementale et le risque suicidaire : Reconsidérer la notion de contexte dans un style de raisonnement émergent," ["Environmental epigenetics and suicide risk: reconsidering notions of context in an emerging style of reasoning,"] Anthropologie & Santé, 9 | 2014.

Nicholas Bartlett, William Garriott and Eugene Raikhel. "What’s in the 'treatment gap'? Ethnographic perspectives on addiction and global mental health from China, Russia, and the United States.Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness, 33:457-477, 2014. DOI: 10.1080/01459740.2013.877900.

Eugene Raikhel and William Garriott, eds. Addiction Trajectories. Duke University Press, 2013.   The Introduction - "Tracing New Paths in the Anthropology of Addiction," is available here. DOI: 10.1215/9780822395874-001

Laurence J. Kirmayer, Eugene Raikhel and Sadeq Rahimi. "Cultures of the Internet: Identity, community and mental health." Transcultural Psychiatry, 50(2): 165-191, 2013. DOI: 10.1177/1363461513490626

Eugene Raikhel. "Radical reductions: Neurophysiology, politics and personhood in Russian addiction medicine." In Critical Neuroscience: A Handbook of the Social and Cultural Contexts of Neuroscience, Suparna Choudhury and Jan Slaby eds. Wiley/Blackwell, 2012. DOI: 10.1002/9781444343359.ch10

Eugene Raikhel. "Post-Soviet Placebos: Epistemology and Authority in Russian Treatments for Alcoholism." Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry., 34(1): 132-68, 2010. DOI 10.1007/s11013-009-9163-1

Eugene Raikhel. "Institutional Encounters: Identification and Anonymity in Russian Addiction Treatment (and Ethnography)." In Being There: The Fieldwork Encounter and the Making of Truth, John Borneman and Abdellah Hammoudi eds. University of California Press, 2009. DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520257757.003.0008

Laurence J. Kirmayer & Eugene Raikhel. "From Amrita to Substance D: Psychopharmacology, Political Economy, and Technologies of the Self." Transcultural Psychiatry, 46(1): 5-15, 2009. DOI: 10.1177/1363461509102284

Amir Raz, Eugene Raikhel and Ran Anbar. "Placebos in Medicine: Knowledge, Beliefs and Patterns of Use." McGill Journal of Medicine, 11(2): 206-211, 2008.

Full Biography
Associate Professor; Director, Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies

Richard Shweder

Richard A. Shweder is a cultural anthropologist and the Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor of Human Development.

Rosenwald 305B Spring Quarter Office Hours: By Appointment. Email rshd@uchicago.edu with possible times. I will get back to you shortly.

Richard A. Shweder is a cultural anthropologist and the Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor of Human Development. He received his Ph.D. degree in social anthropology in the Department of Social Relations at Harvard University in 1972, taught a year at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and has been at the University of Chicago ever since.

He is author of Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology and Why Do Men Barbecue? Recipes for Cultural Psychology (both published by Harvard University Press); and editor or co-editor of many books in the areas cultural psychology, psychological anthropology and comparative human development, including Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and EmotionCultural Psychology: Essays on Comparative Human DevelopmentMetatheory in Social Science: Pluralisms and SubjectivitiesEthnography and Human Development: Meaning and Context in Social InquiryWelcome to Middle Age! (And Other Cultural Fictions); Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies; Clifford Geertz By His Colleagues; and Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the recently published reference work on diversity in child and adolescent development titled The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion (University of Chicago Press).

Professor Shweder has been a recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship (1985-86) and was selected as a Carnegie Scholar (2002). He is the recipient of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Socio-Psychological Prize for his essay “Does the Concept of the Person Vary Cross-Culturally?” He has twice been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Palo Alto (1985-86 and 1995-96), where he has co-chaired a special project on “Culture, Mind and Biology.” He has been a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation (1990-91). He has been a Hewlett Visiting Scholar at the Stanford University Research Institute for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (2003-2004) and a Visiting Scholar at the Stanford University Hoover Institution (Spring 2005 and Spring 2006). He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Midlife Development (MICMAC). He has served as President of the Society for Psychological Anthropology and has served as co-chair for a joint Social Science Research Council/Russell Sage Foundation Working Group on “Law and Culture” (previously named “Ethnic Customs, Assimilation and American Law”), which is concerned with the issue of the “Free Exercise of Culture: How Free Is It? How Free Ought It To Be?” For the past forty years Professor Shweder has been conducting research in cultural psychology on moral reasoning, emotional functioning, gender roles, explanations of illness, ideas about the causes suffering, and the moral foundations of family life practices in the Hindu temple town of Bhubaneswar on the East Coast of India. During the 1999-2000 academic year he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (The Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin) where he co-edited an issue of the journal Daedalus (Autumn 2000) titled The End of Tolerance: Engaging Cultural Differences.

His recent research examines the scopes and limits of pluralism and the multicultural challenge in Western liberal democracies. He examines the norm conflicts that arise when people migrate from Africa, Asia and Latin America to countries in the “North”. They bring with them culturally endorsed practices (e.g., arranged marriage, animal sacrifice, circumcision of both girls and boys, ideas about parental authority) that mainstream populations in the United States or Western Europe sometimes find aberrant and disturbing. How much accommodation to cultural diversity occurs and ought to occur under such circumstances? He has co-edited two books on this topic (with Martha Minow and Hazel Markus) (published June 2002 and April 2008) entitled Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies and Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference (Russell Sage Foundation Press 2008). He is currently writing a book provisionally titled Customs Control: Un-American Activities and The Moral Challenge in Cultural Migration. During the 2008-2009 academic year he was a member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. In 2014 he delivered the Philomathia Lectures on Human Values hosted by the Research Centre for Human Values at the Chinese University of Hong Kong on the topic "The Cultural Psychology of Moral Thinking."

In 2016 he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Psychological Anthropology.

Contact Information
rshd@uchicago.edu

Courses

Cultural Psychology

When Cultures Collide: The Moral Challenge in Cultural Migration

If Someone Asserts It, Deny It: Critical Reason and Political Correctness in Social Science Research

Moral Psychology and Comparative Ethics

Accessible Publications

2020 "Morality Amid Covid-19" hosted by Amber Cazzell on her podcast series "Moral Science" with Bengt Brülde, Bradford Cokelet, Diane Lieberman, and Liane Young. Listen at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep36-covid19

2020 Roy Goodwin D'Andrade: A Biographical Memoir, National Academy of Science online archive.

2019 Richard A. Shweder interviewed by Ricardo Lopes on his "The Dissenter" podcast series. The 95 minute interview is titled "Morality, Haidt's Moral Foundations, and Multiculturalism" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-HRrzg6sM0

2019 With Gratitude to Bob LeVine: His Scholarship, Character, Ancestral Consciousness and Tribal Lore.  Forthcoming in “The Cultural Psyche, Or the Work of Culture in Psychology: The Selected Papers of Robert A. LeVine on the Development of a Psychosocial Science" (Dinesh Sharma, Editor)

2019 Preface by Richard A. Shweder to "All Together Now: American Holiday Symbolism Among Children and Adults" by Cindy Dell Clark.  New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rutgers University Press.  Pages ix-xiii.

Shweder, Richard A. (2019) "Ethical Pluralism and Multicultural Exchanges" (Amber Cazzell interviews Richard A. Shweder on "The Moral Science Podcast".  The interview includes a discussion of several approaches to the study of moral psychology). Listen at: https://anchor.fm/amber-cazzell0/episodes/Ethical-Pluralism-and-Multicultural-Exchanges-with-Richard-Shweder-e5ddr3

Shweder, Richard A. (2019) "A Spirit of Two Research Circles: In Memory of Carolyn Pope Edwards".

Shweder, Richard A. (2019) "The Role of Reason in Cultural Interpretation: Some Talmudic Distinctions for Indigenous and Cultural Psychology" (In Memory of Professor Kuo-Shu Yang)  Forthcoming in Louise Sandararajan (Ed.), Global Psychology from Indigenous Perspectives.  Palgrave Macmillan.

Shweder, Richard A. (2017) ”The Risky Cartography of Drawing Moral Maps: With Special Reference to Economic Inequality and Sex-Selective Abortion” In Universalism without Uniformity, Ed. Julia L. Cassaniti and Usha Menon. The Univesity of Chicago Press: Chicago and London.

Shweder, Richard A. (2017) "The End of the Modern Academy: At the University of Chicago, For Example"  Published in the journal Social Research (Volume 84, no. 3, Fall 2017, pages 695-719). Originally prepared for New School of Social Research Conference on “The Future of Scholarly Knowledge” (October 13-14, 2016). The full text of the copy edited version of the essay is available here. The full text of the published version is available in the Post by the journalist John Tierney.

Shweder, Richard A. (2017) "Social Intelligence in a Multicultural World: What Is It?  Who Needs It? How Does It Develop?"New Persepctives in Human Development, edited by Nancy Budwig, Elliot Turiel, and Philip Zelazo, Cambridge University Press.

Shweder, R. A., & Nisbett, R. L. (2017). "Don’t Let Your Misunderstanding of the Rules Hinder Your Research", The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 19.

Shweder, R. A., & Nisbett, R. L. (2017). "Long-Sought Research Deregulation Is Upon Us. Don't Squander the Moment." The Chronicle of Higher Education. p. A44. March 17

Shweder, Richard A. (2016) "Cracks in the Ivory Tower: A Note on Prewitt's Indirect Consequentialism". Published in "Items: Insights from the Social Sciences" (The Newsletter of the Social Science Research Council)

Shweder, Richard A. (2016)  Let Socrates Back on Campus  (Response to a question posed by the creators and managers of the Heterodox Academy website: "What change would you like to see in universities or in your academic field by 2025?"   

Shweder, Richard A. (2016) "Channeling the Super-Natural Aspects of the the Ethical Life"  (Review of Webb Keane's "The Ethical Life: Its Social and Natural Histories"   HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory  Vol 6. no 1

Shweder, Richard A. (2016)  "Living By Means of the Law of Non-Contradiction", contribution to the Debate on "Anthropology and the Study of Contradictions"  HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory Vol. 6 no. 1

Shweder, Richard A. (2016) "Targeting the Israeli Academy: Will Anthropologists Have the Courage to Just Say 'No'?", Opinion Piece on Huffington Post, Huffpost Politics, March 24th 2016

Shweder, Richard A. (2016) "Equality Now in Genital Reshaping: Brian Earp's Search for Moral Consistency", Kennedy Ethics Institute Journal, forthcoming June issue

Shweder, Richard A. (2015) “Doctoring the Genitals: Towards Broadening the Meaning of Social Medicine” The Journal of Clinical Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp 176- 179

Shweder, R.A., Beldo, L., 2015. "Culture: Contemporary Views." In: James D. Wright (editor-in-chief), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, Vol 5. Oxford: Elsevier. pp. 582–589.

Shweder, Richard A. (2015). "The Ultimate Moral Arbiter, Received Tradition or Autonomous Reason? Some Questions Concerning Morality and Development in Confucian EthicsDao vol. 14, issue 2, pp 219–224

Shweder, Richard A. (2015)  "In Defense of the No Action Option: Institutional Neutrality, Speaking for Oneself, and the Hazards of Corporate Political Opinions"  A talk prepared for the panel on “A House Divided:  Politics, Professional Mobilization, and Academic Freedom in American Anthropology,” November 20, 2015 American Anthropological Association Meetings, Denver, Colorado.

Shweder, Richard A. (2015)  "Anthropology and the Non-Natural Properties of Human Nature: Relax and Enjoy Them" A Commentary on Maurice Bloch’s book Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge prepared for the journal Social Anthropology.

Shweder, Richard A. (2014). "The Tower of Appraisals: Trying to Make Sense of the One Big Thing." Emotion Review, vol. 6, no. 4, pp 1-3.

Shweder, Richard A. (2014). "Cubs Suck: Relax and Enjoy It!" in Psychology Today, 23 April 2014.

Shweder, R.A. (2014). "Let Me Tell You a Story About Hindu Temples and Run Away Trolleys: In Honor of Sudhir Kakar." Psychoanalysis, Culture and Religion: essays in honour of Sudhir Kakar. Dinesh Sharma, Ed. Oxford University Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2013). "Understanding souls: A commentary on Anna Wierzbicka’s natural semantic metalanguage" The Australian Journal of Anthropology, no. 24, pp 22–26.

2013. "Robust Cultural Pluralism: An Interview with Professor Richard A. Shweder" (interviewed by Séamus Power).  Europe's Journal of Psychology, 9:671-686 (Nov. 29, 2013).  Available Open Access: http://ejop.psychopen.eu/article/view/718

Shweder, Richard A. (2013). "The goose and the gander: the genital wars." Global Discourse: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought.

Shweder, Richard A. and Usha Menon (2013). Old Questions for the New Anthropology of Morality: A Commentary. (Forthcoming in a special issue of journal "Anthropological Theory" on the topic of culture and morality, edited by Julia Cassaniti and Jacob Hickman).

Shweder, Richard A. (2012). "The Cultural Psychology of Natural Kinds and the Deconstruction of the Emotions: A CommentEmotion Review Vol. 4, No. 4 pp 382–384

Shweder, Richard A. (2012). "To Follow The Argument Where It Leads: An Antiquarian View of the Aim of Education at the University of Chicago."  In Who's Afraid of Academic Freedom?  Ed. Jonathan Cole, Akeel Bilgrami and Jon Elster.

Shweder, Richard (2012). "In Memoriam: Bertram Cohler 1938-2012." Developments: Newsletter of the Society for Research in Child Development. July 2012 vol. 55 no. 3, pp 15-16.

The Public Policy Advisory Network on Female Genital Surgeries in Africa (2012). "Seven Things to Know About Female Genital Surgeries in Africa."  Hastings Center Report 42:19-27 

Shweder, Richard A. (2012). "Anthropology's Disenchantment With the Cognitive Revolution." In TOPICS: Journal of the Cognitive Science Society. 4(3): 354-61.

Shweder, Richard A. (2012). "The Metaphysical Realities of the Unphysical Sciences: Or Why Vertical Integration Seems Unrealistic to Ontological Pluralists." In Creating Consilience, Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities. Ed. Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard. Oxford University Press, pp 56-73.

Shweder, R.A. (2012). "Relativism and Universalism." Companion to Moral Anthropology. Ed. Didier Fassin. Wiley-Blackwell pp. 85-102. 

Shweder, Richard A.(2010) “How Hanukkah Led Me to Cultural Anthropology: What's on your Un-American Cultural Activities List?” Psychology Today, December 8, 2010, Online Blog Series by Richard Shweder: Cultural Commentary: The Impact of Culture, Tradition and Society on Psyche, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cultural-commentary/201012/how-hanukkah-led-me-cultural-anthropology

Shweder, Richard A.(2010) “Hasty Feelings and a Few Thoughts About Turiel's Lament.” Human Development, August 5, 2010, http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=JournalSpecials&ProduktNr=224249.

Shweder, Richard A.( (2010) “Freud's Friends and Enemies One Hundred Years Later, Part 3: Freud and the Cleansing of Souls”, Psychology Today, Feb. 4, Online Blog Series by Richard Shweder: Cultural Commentary: The Impact of Culture, Tradition and Society on Psyche, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cultural-commentary/201002/freuds-friends-and-enemies-one-hundred-years-later-part-3.

Shweder, Richard A.( (2010) “Freud's Friends and Enemies One Hundred Years Later, Part 2: Freud's Enemies List”, Psychology Today, Feb. 3, Online Blog Series by Richard Shweder: Cultural Commentary: The Impact of Culture, Tradition and Society on Psyche, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cultural-commentary/201002/freuds-friends-and-enemies-one-hundred-years-later-part-2.

Shweder, Richard A.( (2010) “Freud's Friends and Enemies One Hundred Years Later, Part 1:Did Freud Go To Far?  How Far Would You Go?” Psychology Today, Feb. 2, Online Blog Series by Richard Shweder: Cultural Commentary: The Impact of Culture, Tradition and Society on Psyche, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cultural-commentary/201002/freuds-friends-and-enemies-one-hundred-years-later-part-1-0.

Shweder, Richard A.(2010) Intellectuals and “Humanity” as a Whole. Common Knowledge (2010) 16 (1): 1–6.

Shweder, R.A. (2010). "Geertz's Challenge: Is It Possible to Be a Robust Cultural Pluralist and a Dedicated Political Liberal at the Same Time?" In Law Without Nations (edited by Austin Sarat), Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press 2010, pages 185-231.

Shweder, Richard A.( (2009) “Tiger Woods and the Halo Effect”, Psychology Today, Dec. 16, Online Blog Series by Richard Shweder: Cultural Commentary: The Impact of Culture, Tradition and Society on Psyche, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cultural-commentary/200912/tiger-woods-and-the-halo-effect.

Shweder, Richard A. (2009) “A Great Moral Legend from Orissa”  Prepared for Orissa Society of Americas Souvenir, 40th Annual Convention of the Orissa Society of the Americas, July 2009.

Shweder, R.A. (2009). "Shouting at the Hebrews: Imperial Liberalism v Liberal Pluralism and the Practice of Male Circumcision." Law, Culture and the Humanities. 5: 247-265

Shweder, R.A. (2009). “Interview with Fuambai Ahmadu on ‘Disputing the Myth of Sexual Dysfunction in Circumcised Women’”, Anthropology Today, 23(6): 14-17.

Shweder, R.A. (2008). “After Just Schools: Conflicting Varieties of Liberal Hope.” In M. Minow, R.A. Shweder, & H. Markus (Eds.), Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference. New York: Russell Sage Foundation Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2008). "The Cultural Psychology of Suffering: The Many Meanings of Health in Orissa, India (and Elsewhere)." Ethos 36(1): 60-77.

Shweder, R.A., Haidt, Jonathan, Horton & Joseph, Craig (2008). The Cultural Psychology of Emotions: Ancient and Renewed In M. Lewis, Jeannette Haviland-Jones, and Lisa Barrett (Eds.) Handbook of Emotions (3rd Edition). New York: Guilford Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2007). "The Resolute Irresolution of Clifford Geertz.Memorial essay for Clifford Geertz. Written for the journal Common Knowledge (Vol. 13 No. 2)

Shweder, R.A. (2007). "The Revival of Cultural Psychology: Some Premonitions and Reflections." In Shinobu Kitayama and Dov Cohen (Eds.), Handbook of Cultural Psychology, Pp. 821-836. Guilford Press.

Shweder, Richard A. (2006) "Customs Control: Some Anthropological Reflections on Human Rights Crusades." Virginia Journal of Social Policy & the Law, vol. 14, no. 1, Fall 2006, p. 1-38.

Shweder, R.A. (2006). "John Searle on a witch hunt: A commentary on John R. Searle's essay ‘Social ontology: Some basic principles’" Anthropological Theory 2006; Vol. 6, No.1; Pp. 89-111

Shweder, R.A. (2006). "Protecting Human Subjects and Preserving Academic Freedom: Prospects at the University of Chicago.American Ethnologist, Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 507–518

Shweder, R.A., J. Goodnow , G. Hatano , R. Levine , H. Markus & P. Miller (2006) "The Cultural Psychology of Development: One Mind, Many Mentalities." (Revised and Updated) In William Damon (Ed.), Handbook of Child Psychology, 6th Edition, John Wiley and Sons.

Shweder, R.A. (2005). "When Cultures Collide: Which Rights? Whose Tradition of Values? A Critique of the Global Anti-FGM Campaign." Global Justice and the Bulwarks of Localism, pp. 181-199

Shweder, R.A. (2005). "From Persons and Situations to Preferences and Constraints.” This essay expands on remarks delivered on June 11, 2005 at Columbia University at a Festschrift in honor of Walter Mischel titled "Toward a Science of the Person: Paradigm Change in Psychological Models of Human Nature" (organized by Yuichi Shoda and Daniel Cervone).

Shweder, R.A. (2005). "The Fun Index." 480th Convocation Address at the University of Chicago.

Shweder, R.A. (2004). "Tuskegee re-examined. Spiked Essays, www.spiked-online.com. A cultural anthropologist offers a counter-narrative to the infamous story of US government scientists allowing black men to suffer from untreated syphilis, and how this story is used as an example of why we need the Institutional Review Board (IRB) system.

Shweder, R. A. (2004). Deconstructing the Emotions for the Sake of Comparative Research. In A. S. R. Manstead, N. Frijda, & A. Fischer (Eds.), Studies in emotion and social interaction. Feelings and emotions: The Amsterdam symposium (p. 81–97). Cambridge University Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2004). "George Bush and the Missionary Position.Daedalus. 133(3): 26-36.

Shweder, R.A., N. Much, L. Park and M.M. Mahapatra (2003). "The 'Big Three' of Morality (Autonomy, Community, Divinity) and the 'Big Three' Explanations of Suffering.” Originally from "Morality and Health." Allan Brandt and Paul Rozin (eds). New York: Routledge, 1997. Reprinted in "Why Do Men Barbecue?: Recipes for Cultural Psychology." Shweder, R. A. Cambridge, MA: Havrard University Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2003). "The Moral Challenge in Cultural Migration."American Arrivals: Anthropology Engages the New Immigration. School of American Research Press, Santa Fe: New Mexico.

Shweder, R.A. (2003). "Anti-Postculturalism (Or, the View from Manywheres)” In "Why Do Men Barbecue?: Recipes for Cultural Psychology." Shweder, R. A. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Shweder, R.A. (2003). "Toward A Deep Cultural Psychology of Shame." Social Research 70: 1401-1422.

Shweder, R.A. (2002). "The nature of morality: The category of bad acts." From Medical Ethics vol. 9 issue 1, pp. 6-7.

Shweder, R.A. (2002). "'What about female genital mutilation?' and why understanding culture matters in the first place.” From "Engaging cultural differences: the multicultural challenge in liberal democracies", R. Shweder, M. Minow, & H. Markus (Eds.).

Shweder, R.A. (2000). "The Psychology of Practice and the Practice of the Three Psychologies.” Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 3:207-222.

Shweder, R.A. (2000). "Moral Maps, ‘First World’ Conceits and the New Evangelists.” In Lawrence Harrison and Samuel Huntington (Eds.), Culture Matters: Cultural Values and Human Progress, New York: Basic Books, Inc. pages 158-177. Originally prepared for Conference on "Cultural Values and Human Progress," American Academy of Arts and Sciences, April 23-25, 1999.

Shweder, R.A. (1996) "True Ethnography - The Lore, the Law, the Lure" in Ethnography and Human Development edited by Richard Jessor, Anne Colby and Richard A. Shweder, University of Chicago Press

Shweder, R. A. (1996). Quanta and qualia: What is the "object" of ethnographic method? In R. Jessor, A. Colby, & R. A. Shweder (Eds.), The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on mental health and development. Ethnography and human development: Context and meaning in social inquiry (pp. 175-182). Chicago, IL, US: University of Chicago Press.

Shweder, R.A., Jensen, Lene & Goldstein, William A (1995). "Who Sleeps by Whom Revisited: A Method for Extracting the Moral Goods Implicit in Practice.” From the publication Cultural Practices as Contexts for Development. Vol 67, pp 21-39.  J.J. Goodnow, P.J. Miller and F. Kessel, eds., Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco.

Menon, Usha; Shweder, Richard A. (1994) "Kali's tongue: Cultural psychology and the power of shame in Orissa, India." Emotion and culture: Empirical studies of mutual influence. , (pp. 241-282). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xiii, 385 pp.

Shweder, R.A. (1994) "Fundamentalism for Highbrows: The [1993] Aims of Education Address at the University of ChicagoAcademe, Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. Vol. 80, No.6

Shweder, R.A. (1994). "'You're Not Sick, You're Just in Love': Emotion as an Interpretive System." The Nature of Emotions: Fundamental Questions. Edited by Paul Ekman & Richard J. Davidson (New York: Oxford University Press) pp. 32-44.

Shweder, R.A. (1994). "Are Moral Intuitions Self-Evident Truths?” From the journal Criminal Justice Ethics. Vol 13, no 2. pp 24-31.

Shweder, R.A. & Haidt, Jonathan (1993). "The Future of Moral Psychology: Truth, Intuition, and the Pluralist Way.” From the journal Psychological Science. Vol 4, no 6. pp 360-365.

Shweder, R.A. & Sullivan, Maria (1993). "Cultural Psychology: Who Needs It?", Annual Review of Psychology, 44:497-523

Shweder, R.A. (1993). "Why Do Men Barbecue?" and Other Postmodern Ironies of Growing up in the Decade of Ethnicity. Daedalus, Vol. 122 no 1, America's Childhood (Winter, 1993), pp. 279-308.

Shweder, R.A. (1992). Ghostbusters in Anthropology. R.G. D'Andrade and Claudia Strauss (Eds.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Reprinted in Kroeber Anthropological Society Papers nos. 69-70, 1989, pp. 100-108, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley).

Shweder, R.A. & Much, N. (1991). "Determinations of Meaning: Discourse and Moral Socialization." Originally from "Moral Development Through Social Interaction." William Kurtines and Jacob Gewirtz (eds.) Reprinted in "Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology," Shweder, R.A., Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991

Shweder, R.A. (1991). "The Astonishment of Anthropology." In Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology, Shweder, R.A., Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.

Shweder, R.A. & Sullivan, Maria (1990). "The Semiotic Subject of Cultural Psychology."  L. Pervin (Ed.), Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research. New York: Guilford Press.

Shweder, R.A. (1990). "In Defense of Moral Realism: Reply to Gabennesch.” Child Development. Vol 61, no 6. pp 2060-2067.

Shweder, R.A. (1990). "Ethical Relativism: Is There a Defensible Version?"  Ethos, Vol. 18, No. 2, Moral Relativism (June 1990), pp 205-218.

Shweder, R. A. (1988). Suffering in style Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 12(4), 479-497.

Shweder, Richard A. (1987) “How to Look at Medusa without Turning to Stone” Contributions to Indian Sociology, Vol. 21, Issue 1, pp. 37- 55

Shweder, R.A. et al. (1987). "Culture and moral development."  The emergence of morality in young children (pp. 1-83). J. Kagan & S. Lamb (eds). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Shweder, R.A (1986).  "Uneasy Social Science."  Metatheory in Social Science: Pluralisms and Subjectivities, Donald W. Fiske and Richard A. Shweder (Eds.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986, pages 1-18.

Shweder, R.A. (1983). "Culture as a Cognitive System.” Social Cognition and Social Development: A Sociocultural Perspective. E. Tory Higgins, Diane N. Ruble and Willard W. Hartup (Eds.) Cambridge University Press. (Deborah L. Pool, Richard A. Shweder and Nancy C. Much), pp. 193-213.

Shweder, R.A. (1982). "Beyond Self-Constructed Knowledge: The Study of Culture and Morality" Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 1982), pp. 41-69

Shweder, R.A. (1982). Liberalism as Destiny Contemporary Psychology. Vol 27, no 6. pp 421-424.

Shweder, R.A. & Bourne, E.J. (1982). "Does the concept of the person vary cross-culturally?" Originally from Cultural Conceptions of Mental Health and Therapy, A. Marsella and G. White (eds.) Dordrecht, Holland: Reidel. Reprinted in Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology, Shweder, R.A., Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.

Much N., Shweder, R.A. and Turiel, E. (1981). "The moral intuitions of the child.” Social Cognitive Development: Frontiers and Possible Futures. John H. Flavell & Lee Ross (eds). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Shweder, Richard A. "Rethinking Culture and Personality Theory Part III: From Genesis and Typology to Hermeneutics and Dynamics." Ethos , Vol. 8, No. 1 (Spring, 1980), pp. 60-94

Shweder, Richard A. "Rethinking Culture and Personality Theory Part II: A Critical Examination of Two More Classical Postulates." Ethos , Vol. 7, No. 4 (Winter, 1979), pp. 279-311

Shweder, Richard A. "Rethinking Culture and Personality Theory Part I: A Critical Examination of Two Classical Postulates." Ethos , Vol. 7, No. 3 (Autumn, 1979), pp. 255-278

Lucy, J., & Shweder, R. (1979). "Whorf and His Critics: Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Influences on Color Memory." American Anthropologist, 81, 581-615.

Shweder, R.A. & Much, N. (1978). "Speaking of Rules: The Analysis of Culture in Breach.” In William Damon (Ed.), New Directions in Child Development, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp.19-39.

Shweder, R. A. (1977) "Likeness and Likelihood in Everyday Thought: Magical Thinking in Judgments About Personality [and Comments and Reply]"
Current Anthropology, Vol. 18, No. 4. Dec. , pp. 637-658.

Shweder, R.A. (1973). "The between and within of Cross-Cultural ResearchEthos, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 531-545

Shweder, Richard A. (1972) Review of Learning to Be Rotuman: Enculturation in the South Pacific. by Alan Howard. American Journal of Sociology 78, no. 2 (1972):482-83

Shweder, Richard A.(1972) Aspects of Cognition in Zinacanteco Shamans: Experimental Results, In Reader in Comparative Religion, W. Lessa and EZ Vogt, (eds.) New York: Harper & Row.

Books: Collections and Edited Volumes

The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion University of Chicago Press: Chicago. 2009 (Richard Shweder, Editor-in-Chief, Tom Bidell, Anne Dailey, Suzanne Dixon, Peggy Miller and John Modell, Editors)

Why Do Men Barbecue?: Recipes for Cultural Psychology. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA (2003).

Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies.  Russell Sage Foundation Press: NY (Richard A. Shweder, Martha Minow, Hazel Markus, editors) (2002).

Ethnography and Human Development: Context and Meaning in Social Inquiry. The University of Chicago Press: (Richard Jessor, Anne Colby, and Richard Shweder, editors) (1996).

Clifford Geertz by His Colleagues. The University of Chicago Press. (Richard Shweder and Byron Good, editors).

Welcome to Middle Age! (And Other Cultural Fictions). University of Chicago Press.  (Richard A. Shweder, editor).

Cultural Psychology: The Chicago Symposia. New York: Cambridge University Press. (James Stigler, Richard A. Shweder, Gilbert Herdt, editors).

Thinking through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology.Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press.

Metatheory in Social Science: Pluralisms and Subjectivities. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. (Richard A. Shweder and D.W. Fiske, editors) (1986).

Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and Emotion. New York: Cambridge University Press, (Richard A. Shweder and Robert A. Levine, editors) (1984).

 
Full Biography
Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor

Margaret Beale Spencer

Contact: Oliver Garland, Operations Manager for the Urban Resiliency Initiative

On leave Winter and Spring 2020.

Rosenwald 305C

Contact: Oliver Garland, Operations Manager for the Urban Resiliency Initiative

Margaret Beale Spencer, Marshall Field IV Professor of Urban Education and Life Course Development

Affiliate Faculty Member in the Committee on Education,

Affiliate Faculty Member in the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture 

Biography

Margaret Beale Spencer is the Marshall Field IV Professor of Urban Education in the department of Comparative Human Development. She is also an alumna of the Committee on Human Development. Before returning to Chicago, she was the endowed Board of Overseers Professor and Director of the Interdisciplinary Studies of Human Development (ISHD) faculty member in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, she was Director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Achievement Neighborhood Growth and Ethnic Studies (CHANGES), and also guided as its inaugural director, the W. E. B. Du Bois Collective Research Institute. Guiding the noted efforts and continuing to frame her scholarship, Spencer's Phenomenological Variant of Ecological Systems Theory (PVEST) provides an identity-focused cultural ecological perspective. It serves as the foundation for her gender, culture and context acknowledging, developmental race and ethnicity sensitive research emphasis. The conceptual framework addresses resiliency, identity, and competence formation processes for diverse humans—particularly youth—both in the United States and abroad.

In addition to Spencer's ongoing program of research, she frequently collaborates with groups for the purpose of applying the research findings to settings having a stated mission or purpose which addresses youths' emerging capacity for healthy outcomes and constructive coping methods. Given that the basic evaluation and applied research activities representing intervention collaborations occur in challenging contexts, the outcomes have significant implications for understanding not just the "what" of life course human development but the "why" of particular developmental trajectories.

Professor Spencer’s current focus is the development of a multi-pronged research and programming agenda designed to foster and unleash resiliency-promoting opportunities in urban neighborhoods and her surrounding communities. This Urban Resiliency Initiative (URI) is a non-profit consulting and advisory group committed to providing high-quality tools and services designed to enhance and unleash and promote the resiliency of youth and adults living in urban centers. Resiliency speaks to the ability to develop recuperative and restorative behaviors (i.e. coping behaviors) and protective processes to offset trauma, whether individually or contextually derived. URI’s principal focus is to provide multigenerational support for the four major adult oriented leadership institutions that shape, socialize and develop young people. These essential supports or “pillars” include Parenting, Teaching, Policing, and Multi-level Community Health, or to state more inclusively: Family, Education, Safety, and Universal Wellness.

Guided by principles of identity-informed leadership and purposeful wisdom goals, the URI works to positively impact the character of available adult professional supports. At the same time, it collaborates directly with community and after-school translational learning enhancing activities for affording transformative youth outcomes. The strategy is in contrast to traditional deficit-centered models. Specifically, the URI posits that all humans are vulnerable and risks and supports are unevenly distributed through society evident both historically and contemporaneously. By combining the noted cultural and context linked life course human development perspective with the dual level adult and youth legacy strategy focus, our initiative aims to maximize the potential for positive outcomes across generations and, thus, contribute to a sustainable legacy of human flourishing.

Having authored over 140 scholarly publications, edited several volumes, and provided Congressional Testimony in the nation’s Capital, Margaret Beale Spencer was recently elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2019). In addition, Spencer holds elected membership in the National Academy of Education including Board Membership. She holds Fellow status in several Divisions of the American Psychological Association (APA) as well as awarded the organization’s Life Time Achievement Award (2018); prior to that recognition by APA, in 2005 the organization acknowledged her Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Senior Career Award. She was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters Degree from Northwestern University, and the Diversity Leadership Faculty Award at the University of Chicago. She was named recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Division 7 (Developmental Science) 2018 Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Distinguished Contributions to Developmental Science. She also received the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Award for Distinguished Contributions to Cultural and Ecological Research. She was an inaugural Fellow of the American Education Research Association (AERA) and invited to provide the organization’s prestigious Brown Lecture. Spencer received the Alphonse Fletcher Fellowship awarded for scholarly and artistic works devoted to the legacy of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Decision. Margaret Beale Spencer’s scholarship has been produced with significant funding provided by dozens of Foundation and Federal Awards and funding as well as featured in national broadcasting and provided internationally by ABC and CNN.

Selected Publications

Spencer, M. B., Lodato, B. N., Spencer, C., Rich, L., Graziul, C., & English-Clarke, T. (2019). Chapter Four – Innovating resilience promotion: Integrating cultural practices, social ecologies and development-sensitive conceptual strategies for advancing child wellbeing. In D. A. Henry, E. Votruba-Drzal, & P. Miller (Eds.), Advances in Child Development and Behavior (Vol. 57, pp. 101–148). JAI. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.acdb.2019.05.005

Harris, J.A., Spencer, M.B. Kruger, A.C., & Irving, M.A., (2019). An Examination and Interrogation of African American Males’ Racial Identity, Prosocial Behaviors and Aggression, Research in Human Development, 16:1, 76-91, DOI:10.1080/15427609.2018.1556068

Rious, J.B., Cunningham, M. & Spencer, M.B. (2019). Rethinking the Notion of “Hostility” in African American Parenting Styles, Research in Human Development, 16:1, 35-50, DOI: 10.1080/15427609.2018.1541377

Spencer M.B., Developmental and Intersectional Insights About Diverse Children's Identity, 71(1) Fla. L. Rev. F. 12 (2019).

Spencer, M. B. (2018). Self. In Bornstein, M. H. (Ed.) The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development. (pp. 1917-1920). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Spencer, M.B. (2017). Privilege and Critical Race Perspectives’ Intersectional Contributions to a Systems Theory of Human Development. In. Budwig, N. Turiel, E., & Zelazo, P. (Eds.) New Perspectives on Human Development, (pp. 258-286). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Spencer, M.B. & Hope, E. (2017). Civic Engagement as an Adaptive Coping Response to Conditions of Inequality: An Application of Phenomenological Variant of Ecological Systems Theory (PVEST). In N. Cabrera & Leyendecker, B. (Eds.) Handbook on Positive Development of Minority Children and Youth (pp. 421-434). New York: Springer.

McGee, E.O. & Spencer, M.B. (2015). Black Parents as Advocates, Motivators, and Teachers of Mathematics. The Journal of Negro Education, 84(3), 473–490.

Spencer, M. B. (2005). Crafting identities and accessing opportunities post-Brown. American Psychologist, 60(8), 821-830.

Swanson, D., Cunningham, M., Spencer, M. B., (2005) Black males’ structural conditions, achievement patterns, normative needs, and “opportunities.” In O. Fashola (Ed.), Educating African American males: voices from the field (pp. 229-254), Corwin Press: Thousand Oaks, CA. (Reprinted from Urban Education Journal, 38(5), 608-633, 2003).

Spencer, M. B., Noll, E., & Cassidy, E. (2005). Monetary incentives in support of academic achievement: results of a randomized field trial involving high-achieving, low-resource, ethnically diverse urban adolescents. Evaluation Research, 29(3), 199-222.

Spencer, M. B., Cross, W. E., Harpalani, V., & Goss, T. N. (2003). Historical and developmental perspectives on Black academic achievement: Debunking the “acting White” myth and posing new directions for research. In C. C. Yeakey & R. D. Henderson (Eds.), Surmounting all odds: Education, opportunity and society in the new millennium (pp. 273-304). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishers.

Swanson, D., Cunningham, M., Spencer, M. B., (2003). Black males’ structural conditions, achievement patterns, normative needs, and “opportunities.” Urban Education Journal, 38(5), 608-633.

Spencer, M. B., Noll, E., & Stoltzfus, J., & Harpalani, V. (2001). Identity and school adjustment: Revisiting the “acting White” assumption. Educational Psychologist, 36(1), 21-30.

Connell, J. P., Spencer, M. B., & Aber, J. L. (1994). Educational risk and resilience in African-American youth: Context, self, action and outcomes in school. Child Development, 65, 493-506.

Selected Honors

2019 Elected Membership: American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Cambridge, MA)

2018 American Psychological Association Lifetime Achievement Award (August 9-12 2018), San Francisco, CA.

2018 American Psychological Association Division 7 (Developmental Science) Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Distinguished Contributions to Developmental Science (August 9-12 2018), San Francisco, CA.

2018 Convocation Speaker, Social Science Division University of Chicago (June 2018)

2015 Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, Northwestern University (June 19, 2015)

2015 Convocation Speaker, Grad School of Education, Northwestern University (June 2, 2015)

2011 Society for Research in Child Development Award for Distinguished Contributions to Cultural and Ecological Research

2009 Membership Election, National Academy of Education, May 2009

2008 Named an Inaugural Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA)

2007 AERA Invited Presenter of the Fourth Annual Brown Lecture in Education Research, American Educational Research Association (AERA), October 18, 2007.

2006 Alphonse Fletcher, Sr., Fellowship (for scholarly and artistic works devoted to the legacy of 1954 Brown v. Board of Education.)

2005 Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Senior Career Award, American Psychological Association (APA), August 2005.

Full Biography
Marshall Field IV Professor of Urban Education
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