This is an unofficial list of courses anticipated in coming quarters. Finalized course schedules are published on the registrar's Course Search Page. The documents of record for courses and requirements can be found at the College Catalog and the Graduate Announcement archives.

Fall 2019

Undergraduate

20000. Intro to Human Development (E. Raikhel)

20001. Theories of Sexuality and Gender (K. Schilt, L. Berlant)

20175. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior (K. Schilt)

20209. Adolescent Development (M. Beale Spencer)

20305. Inequality in Urban Spaces (M. Keels)

21000. Cultural Psychology (R. Shweder)

22350. Social Neuroscience (J. Decety)

23301. Culture, Mental Health and Psychiatry (E. Raikhel)

23407. Apprenticeship: Learning on the Job ( D. Ansari)

25002. Feminism, Race, Culture, and Liberation (T. Mandviwala)

26000. Introduction to Social Psychology (B. Goldstein)

27860. History of Evolutionary Behavior Sciences (D. Maestripieri)

27861. Darwinism and Literature (D. Maestripieri, R. Richards)

29900. Honors Paper Preparation (K. Robbins)

Graduate

30511. Computing for the Social Sciences (B. Soltoff)

30901. Biopsychology of Sex Differences (J. Mateo)

31000. Cultural Psychology: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations (R. Shweder)

32401. Multilevel Modeling (D. Hedeker)

32702. Statistical Applications (R. Gibbons)

33301. Culture, Mental Health and Psychiatry (E. Raikhel)

34501. Anthropology of Museums -1 (F. Morris)

37201. Language in Culture 1 (M. Silverstein)

37860. History of Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences (D. Maestripieri)

37861. Darwinism and Literature (D. Maestripieri, R. Richards)

40000. HD Concepts (J. Lucy)

40192. Seminar: The Family (L. Waite)

40207. Development in Adolescents (M. Beale Spencer)

40305. Inequality in Urban Spaces (M. Keels)

40404. Computation and Identification of Cultural Patterns (J. Clindaniel)

42402. Trial Research in Human Development - II (R. Shweder)

43600. Processes of Judgment and Decision Making (B. Goldstein)

48412. Publications, Grants, and the Academic Job Market (D. Maestripieri)

Winter 2020

Undergraduate

20122. Introduction to Population (L. Waite) 

20300. Biological Psychology (S. London, G. Norman)

20778. Motivation and Emotions: Beyond the Biologically Basic and Culturally Specific Dichotomy(S. Numanbayraktaroglu)

21500. Darwinian Health (J. Mateo)

22103. Feminisms & Anthropology (J. Cole, J. Chu)

22580. Child Development in the Classroom (K. O'Doherty)

23003. Schooling and Identity (L. Rosen)

23249. Animal Behavior (S. Pruett-Jones)

23305. Critical Studies of Mental Health In Higher Education (E. Raikhel)

23406. Migration Trajectories: Ethnographies of Place and the Production of Diasporas ( D. Ansari)

24335. Introduction to Medical Anthropology and Critical Studies of Global Health (P. Brotherton)

25120. Child Development and Public Policy (A. Kalil)

26206. Self in Contexts: Being and Becoming in Social Interaction (S. Numanbayraktaroglu)

28301. Disability and Design (M. Friedner, J. Iverson)

29700. Undergraduate Reading and Research (Select Faculty Advisor)

Graduate

30102. Introduction to Causal Inference (G. Hong)

30510. Computational Content Analysis (J. Evans)

32103. Feminisms & Anthropology (J. Cole, J. Chu)

33305. Critical Studies of Mental Health in Higher Education (E. Raikhel)

36655. Advanced Topics in Epigenetics of the Brain (S. London)

37202. Language in Culture-2 (S. Gal)

39900. Readings: Human Development (Select Faculty Advisor)

40770. Early Childhood: Human Capital Development and Public Policy (A. Kalil)

40900. Behavior Ecology (J. Mateo)

43660. Research Topics in Gesture and Learning II (S. Goldin-Meadow)

43680.  Topics in Language and Gesture (S. Goldin-Meadow)

45100. Seminar: Anthropology of the Body (S. Brotherton)

45401. The Anthropology of Disability (M. Friedner)

45699. When Cultures Collide: Multiculturalism in Liberal Democracies (R. Shweder)

48002. Mind and Biology Proseminar 2 (S. Shevell)

49900. Research in Human Development (Select Faculty Advisor)


Spring 2020

Undergraduate

12103. Treating Trans: Practices of Medicine, Practice of Theory (P. Martin)

20100. Human Development Research Designs (G. Hong)

20971. Xcap: The Experiment Capstone - What is an Intervention (For Mental Health)? (E. Raikhel)

21920. The Evolution of Language (S. Mufwene)

23002. Suicide: One Phenomenon, Multiple Perspectives (S. Miklin)

23007. Language, Culture, and Education (L. Rosen)

23370. Bright and Dark Sides of Empathy (J. Decety)

23405. Cultural Diversity, Structural Barriers, and Multilingualism in Clinical and Healing Encounters (D. Ansari)

24341. Topics in Medical Anthropology (S. Brotherton)

25003. Multicultural Development and Gender (T. Mandviwala)

25900. Intro to Developmental Psychology (K. O'Doherty)

29700. Undergraduate Reading and Research (Select Faculty Advisor)

29800. BA Honors Seminar (K. Robbins)

29900. BA Honors Preparation (K. Robbins)

Graduate

30511. Computing for the Social Sciences (B. Soltoff)

32501. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis (D. Hodeker)

34710. In Conversation with Language & Culture (P. Fan)

36008. Principles and Methods of Measurement (Y. Sheng)

38950. The Development of Communicative Competence (M. Casillas)

38990. Muslims in the United States and Western Europe (E. Abdelhadi)

39900. Readings: Human Development (Select Faculty Advisor)

40310. Topics in Medical Anthropology (S. Brotherton)

40853. Topics in Developmental Psychology

41603. Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology (S. Levine, A. Shaw)

41920. The Evolution of Language (S. Mufwene)

40853. Topics in Dev. Psychology (A. Shaw)

41920. The Evolution of Language (S. Mufwene)

42350. Development Over the Life Course (S. Hans)

42401. Trial Research in Hum Dev 1 (M. Friedner)

43661. Research Topics in Gesture and Learning I (S. Goldin-Meadow)

43690. Topics in Action, Representation, and Gesture (S. Goldin-Meadow)

47300. Linguistic Anthropology Practicum (C. Nakassis)

48003. Mind and Biology Proseminar 3 (S. Shevell)

49900. Research in Human Development (Select Faculty Advisor)


Courses

Undergraduate

Course Areas
A. Comparative Behavioral Biology
B. Life Course Development
C. Culture and Community
D. Mental Health
M. Methods

12103. Treating Trans: Practices of Medicine, Practice of Theory. (GNSE 12103, ANTH 25212, HIPS 12103, HLTH 12103) Medical disciplines from psychiatry to surgery have all attempted to identify and to treat gendered misalignment, while queer theory and feminisms have simultaneously tried to understand if and how trans- theories should be integrated into their respective intellectual projects. This course looks at the logics of the medical treatment of transgender (and trans- more broadly) in order to consider the mutual entanglement of clinical processes with theoretical ones. Over the quarter we will read ethnographic accounts and theoretical essays, listen to oral histories, discuss the intersections of race and ability with gender, and interrogate concepts like "material bodies" and "objective science". Primary course questions include: 1. How is “trans-” conceptualized, experienced, and lived? How has trans-studies distinguished itself from feminisms and queer theories? 2. What are the objects, processes, and problematics trans- medicine identifies and treats? How is “trans-” understood and operationalized through medical practices? 3. What meanings of health, power, knowledge, gender, and the body are utilized or defined by our authors? What relations can we draw between them? CHDV Distribution: D (P. Martin, Spring)

20000. Intro to Human Development. PQ: CHDV majors or intended majors. (=HLTH 20000, PSYC 20850) This course provides an introduction to the study of lives in context. The nature of human development from infancy through old age will be explored through theory and empirical findings from various disciplines. Reading and discussion will emphasize the interrelations of biological, psychological, sociocultural forces at different points of the life cycle. CHDV Distribution: R (Raikhel, Autumn).

20001. Theories of Sexuality and Gender. PQ: Some background in critical theory. (=GNSE 20001, ENGL 20001, LLSO 20001, SOCI 20290) This is a one-quarter, seminar-style introductory course for undergraduates. Its aim is triple: to engage scenes and concepts central to the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality; to provide familiarity with key theoretical anchors for that study; and to provide skills for deriving the theoretical bases of any kind of method. Students will produce descriptive, argumentative, and experimental engagements with theory and its scenes as the quarter progresses. Prior course experience in gender/sexuality studies (by way of the general education civilization studies courses or other course work) is strongly advised. CHDV Distribution: B, C (K. Schilt, L. Berlant).

20100. Human Development Research Designs in the Social Sciences. (=EDSO 20100, HLTH 20100, PSYC 21100)This course aims to expose students to a variety of examples of well-designed social research addressing questions of great interest and importance. One goal is clarify what it means to do"interesting" research. A second goal is to appreciate the features of good research design. A third goal is to examine the variety of research methodologies in the social sciences, including ethnography, clinical case interviewing, survey research, experimental studies of cognition and social behavior, behavior observations, longitudinal research, and model building. The general emphasis is on what might be called the aesthetics of well-designed research. CHDV Distribution: R (G. Hong, Spring).

20122. Introduction to Population. (=SOCI 20122, GNSE 20120, ENST 20500) This course provides an introduction to the field of demography, which examines the growth and characteristics of human populations. It also provides an overview of our knowledge of three fundamental population processes: fertility, mortality, and migration. We cover marriage, cohabitation, marital disruption, aging, and population and environment. In each case we examine historical trends. We also discuss causes and consequences of recent trends in population growth, and the current demographic situation in developing and developed countries. CHDV Distribution: B (L. Waite, Winter)

20175. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior. (=SOCI 20175) This course examines how distinctions between "normal" and "deviant" are created, and how these labels shift historically, culturally, and politically. We analyze the construction of social problems and moral panics - smoking, "satanic" daycares, internet trolls - to explore how various moral entrepreneurs shape what some sociologists call a "culture of fear." Additionally, we investigate the impact on individuals of being labeled "deviant" either voluntarily or involuntarily, as a way of illustrating how both social control and social change operate in society. CHDV Distribution: D (K. Schilt, Autumn)

20209. Adolescent Development. (=PSYC 20209) Adolescence represents a period of unusually rapid growth and development. At the same time, under the best of social circumstances and contextual conditions, the teenage years represent a challenging period. The period also affords unparalleled opportunities with appropriate levels of support. Thus, the approach taken acknowledges the challenges and untoward outcomes, while also speculates about the predictors of resiliency and the sources of positive youth development. CHDV Distribution: B  (M. B. Spencer, Autumn)

20300. Biological Psychology. (=BIOS 29300, PSYC 20300) PQ: Some background in biology and psychology. What are the relations between mind and brain? How do brains regulate mental, behavioral, and hormonal processes; and how do these influence brain organization and activity? This course introduces the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the brain; their changes in response to the experiential and sociocultural environment; and their relation to perception, attention, behavioral action, motivation, and emotion. Some background in biology and psychology. CHDV Distribution: A (S. London and G. Norman, Winter)

20305/40305. Inequality in Urban Spaces. (=CRES 20305, EDSO 20305, EDSO 40315, PBPL 20305) The problems confronting urban schools are bound to the social, economic, and political conditions of the urban environments in which schools reside. Thus, this course will explore social, economic, and political issues, with an emphasis on issues of race and class as they have affected the distribution of equal educational opportunities in urban schools. We will focus on the ways in which family, school, and neighborhood characteristics intersect to shape the divergent outcomes of low- and middle-income children residing with any given neighborhood. Students will tackle an important issue affecting the residents and schools in one Chicago neighborhood. This course is part of the College Course Cluster: Urban Design. CHDV Distribution: B, 2* (M. Keels, Autumn)

20778. Motivation and Emotions: Beyond the Biologically Basic and Culturally Specific Dichotomy. This course provides a broad overview of theory and research on human emotions and motivation across different fields of social sciences. CHDV Distribution: D (S. Numanbayraktaroglu, Winter)

20971. Xcap: The Experiment Capstone - What is an Intervention (For Mental Health)? (=HLTH 29971, KNOW 20971) What does it mean for a practice to be understood as an intervention in the domain of mental health? Interventions in mental health can be carried out with tools ranging from chemicals and electrical impulses, to words, affects, and social relationships, to organizations. They can involve acting on a range of distinct targets -- from brains and bodies to psyches and emotional conflicts to housing and employment. This course will use a focus on mental health interventions to introduce students to a range of conceptual and practical issues surrounding mental health and illness, as well as to raise a set of broader questions about the relationships between knowledge formation, practice, ethics, and politics. The questions we will ask throughout the course will include: What does it mean for an intervention to be successful? How is effectiveness understood and measured? Are mental health interventions ethically-neutral or do they contain embedded within them assumptions about the normal, the pathological, and the good life? We will think through these questions vis-a-vis readings drawn from psychiatry, psychology, and the social sciences -- but more importantly, through weekly practical and experiential activities. Each week will focus on one kind of mental health intervention, and will involve a particular kind of practical learning activity. This course is one of three offered in The Experimental Capstone (XCAP) in the 2019-20 academic year. Enrollment in this course is restriced to 3rd and 4th year undergraduates in the College. For more information about XCAP, visit https://sifk.uchicago.edu/courses/xcap/. CHDV Distribution: D (M. Marcangelo and E. Raikhel, Spring)

21000/31000. Cultural Psychology. (=AMER 33000, ANTH 24320/35110, EDSO 21100, GNSE 21001/31000, PSYC 23000/33000) PQ: Third or fourth year standing. There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space.  At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world.  Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups.  In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization and reasoning. CHDV Distribution: B, C; 2*, 3* (R. Shweder, Autumn).

21500. Darwinian Health. (=GNDR 21500, HIPS 22401, HLTH 21500, BIOS 23405)  This course will use an evolutionary, rather than clinical, approach to understanding why we get sick. In particular, we will consider how health issues such as menstruation, senescence, pregnancy sickness, menopause, and diseases can be considered adaptations rather than pathologies. We will also discuss how our rapidly changing environments can reduce the benefits of these adaptations. CHDV Distribution: A (J. Mateo, Winter).

21920/41920. The Evolution of Language. (=LING 41920,CHSS 41920, EVOL 41920, LING 21920, ANTH 47305, PSYC 41920) How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern “fossils” in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more. CHDV Distribution: B, 5* (S. Mufwene, Spring)

22350. Social Neuroscience. (=BIOS 24137, ECON 21830, HLTH 22350, NSCI 21000, PSYC 22350) Social species, by definition, create emergent organizations beyond the individual — structures ranging from dyads and families to groups and cultures. Social neuroscience is the interdisciplinary field devoted to the study of neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms, and to the study of the associations and influences between social and biological levels of organization.The course provides a valuable interdisciplinary framework for students in psychology, neuroscience, behavioral economics and comparative human development. Many aspects of social cognition will be examined, including but not limited to attachment, attraction, altruism, contagion, cooperation, competition, dominance, empathy, isolation, morality, and social decision-making. CHDV Distribution: A (J. Decety. Autumn).

22580. Child Development in the Classroom. (=PSYC 22580, EDSO 22580, HLTH 22580) This discussion-based, advanced seminar is designed to investigate how preschool and elementary students think, act, and learn, as well as examine developmentally appropriate practices and culturally responsive teaching in the classroom. This course emphasizes the application of theory and research from the field of psychology to the realm of teaching and learning in contemporary classrooms. Course concepts will be grounded in empirical research and activities geared towards understanding the nuances and complexities of topics such as cognitive development (memory, attention, language), early assessment systems, standardized testing, "mindset", "grit", exercise/nutrition, emotion regulation, and more. CHDV Distribution: B (K. O'Doherty, Winter)

23002.  Suicide: One Phenomenon, Multiple Perspectives. This course provides an overview of multiple approaches to studies of social and individual ‘problems’ through the case study of suicide. including social and medical sciences, philosophy, law and even art—through the case study of suicide. Through the class, the students will: (1) acquire a complex and contextualized picture of suicide, as well as deviance and (mental) health more generally, (2) develop a basic understanding assumptions and approaches central to various fields of inquiry, including social and medical sciences, philosophy, law and even art, (3) investigate a phenomenon of their own interest in a way that can assist them with future projects (e.g. thesis). CHDV Distribution: D (S. Miklin, Spring)

23003. Schooling and Identity. (=EDSO 23002/33002) This course examines the dynamic relations between schooling and identity. We will explore how schools both enable and constrain the identities available to students and the consequences of this for academic achievement. We will examine these relations from multiple disciplinary perspectives, applying psychological, anthropological, sociological, and critical theories to understanding how students not only construct identities for themselves within schools, but also negotiate the identities imposed on them by others. Topics will include the role of peer culture, adult expectations, school practices and enduring social structures in shaping processes of identity formation in students and how these processes influence school engagement and achievement. We will consider how these processes unfold at all levels of schooling, from preschool through college, and for students who navigate a range of social identities, from marginalized to privileged. CHDV Distribution: B (L. Rosen, Winter).

23007. Language, Culture, and Education. (=EDSO 23007) In this introductory course, we examine current theories and research about differential educational achievement in US schools, including: (1) theories that focus on the characteristics of people (e.g., their biological makeup, their psychological characteristics, their internal traits, their essential qualities); (2) theories that focus on the characteristics of groups and settings, (e. g., ethnic group culture, school culture); and (3) theories that examine how cultural processes mediate political-economic constraints and human action. We will discuss and debate the educational consequences of these positions, especially for low income and ethnic and linguistic minority students in the US. CHDV Distribution: B (L. Rosen, Spring).

23249. Animal Behavior. (=BIOS 23249, PSYC 23249) This course introduces the mechanism, ecology, and evolution of behavior, primarily in nonhuman species, at the individual and group level. Topics include the genetic basis of behavior, developmental pathways, communication, physiology and behavior, foraging behavior, kin selection, mating systems and sexual selection, and the ecological and social context of behavior. A major emphasis is placed on understanding and evaluating scientific studies and their field and lab techniques. CHDV Distribution: A (S. Pruett-Jones, Winter)

23301/33301. Culture, Mental Health and Psychiatry. (=ANTH 24315, ANTH 35115, HIPS 27302, HLTH 23301) Prerequisites: Undergraduates must have previously completed a SOSC sequence. While mental illness has recently been framed in largely neurobiological terms as “brain disease,” there has also been an increasing awareness of the contingency of psychiatric diagnoses.  In this course, we will draw upon readings from medical and psychological anthropology, cultural psychiatry, and science studies to examine this paradox and to examine mental health and illness as a set of subjective experiences, social processes and objects of knowledge and intervention. On a conceptual level, the course invites students to think through the complex relationships between categories of knowledge and clinical technologies (in this case, mainly psychiatric ones) and the subjectivities of persons living with mental illness.  Put in slightly different terms, we will look at the multiple links between psychiatrists’ professional accounts of mental illness and patients' experiences of it. Questions explored include: Does mental illness vary across social and cultural settings? How are experiences of people suffering from mental illness shaped by psychiatry’s knowledge of their afflictions? CHDV Distribution: C, D (E. Raikhel, Autumn)

23305/33305Critical Studies of Mental Health in Higher Education. (=ANTH 24333, ANTH 35133) PQ: Registration by instructor consent only. This course draws on a range of perspectives from across the interpretive, critical, and humanistic social sciences to examine the issues of mental health, illness, and distress in higher education. CHDV Distribution: D, 4 (E. Raikhel, Winter)

23370. Bright and Dark Sides of Empathy. (=PSYC 23370) This course invites students to critically explore the science of empathy by examining its scope and its limits. It delves into cutting-edge research from evolutionary theory, neurobiology, developmental and social psychology, social neuroscience, clinical neuroscience, and behavioral economics to illuminate the mechanisms behind feeling for and with others. Questions explored in this course include: What are the evolutionary roots of empathy? What are the neural and neuro-endocrinological mechanisms that facilitate empathy? How does empathy develop in young children? Is empathy a limited-capacity resource? How is empathy modulated by unconscious processing and implicit attitudes (e.g., group dynamics, social status)? Is empathy necessarily a good thing for social decision-making? Why empathy can make us act unfairly? Why do some individuals (i.e., psychopaths) lack empathy and concern for the well-being of others? How does empathy improve the overall effectiveness of medical care? This course introduces undergraduate students to current research and theories of empathy. The study of empathy serves as the basis for integrating a variety of perspectives including evolutionary biology, behavioral economics, affective neuroscience, developmental psychology, social psychology, behavioral neurology and psychiatry. CHDV Distribution: B. (J. Decety. Spring)

23405. Cultural Diversity, Structural Barries, and Multilingualism in Clinical and Healing Encounters. (=CRES 23405, HLTH 23407)How are illness, disorder, and recovery experienced in different localities and cultural contexts? How do poverty, racism, and gender discrimination translate to individual experiences of disease? Combining anthropological perspectives on health and illness with a social determinants of health framework, this class will examine topics such as local etiologies of disease and healing practices, linguistic interpretation in clinical and healing contexts, and structural factors that hinder healthcare access and instigate disorder. Moreover, by taking clinical and healing encounters as our locus of analysis, we will explore how healers and health professionals recognize and respond to diversity, power imbalances, and the language individuals give to illness and suffering. We will draw on a range of materials, from ethnographies to long form journalism to the perspectives of course visitors, in order to examine case studies in mental illness, sexual health, organ donation and transplantation, and chronic disease in a variety of geographic contexts. CHDV Distribution: C, D (D. Ansari, Spring)

23406. Migration Trajectories: Ethnographies of Place and the Production of Diasporas. (=GLST 23406, CRES 23406) Global movements of people have resulted in a substantial number of immigrant communities whose navigation of various facets of everyday life has been complicated by restrictive citizenship regimes and immigration policies, as well as linguistic and cultural differences. The experiences of a wide range of individuals involved in migration raise the following questions: what strategies do immigrants use to negotiate transnational identities and what are the implications of these strategies? How do future generations manage simultaneous and intersectional forms of belonging? To address these questions, we will draw on ethnographic texts that explore various facets of transnational migration, such as diasporas, place, citizenship, mobility, and identities. The term “trajectories,” reflects different situations of migration that are not necessarily linear or complete. Moreover, term “place” is meant to capture the continuity between displacement and emplacement, and to critically analyze the durability associated with notions of ‘sending’ and ‘receiving’ countries. Lastly, rather than take diasporas as a given, we will explore the ways that they are produced and enacted in a variety of geographic contexts. CHDV Distribution: C, D (D. Ansari, Winter)

23407Apprenticeship: Learning on the Job. (=ANTH 22175, KNOW 22175) What do psychotherapists, lucha libre wrestlers, and magicians have in common? Perhaps that much of their learning occurs informally while on the job, rather than in formal pedagogical encounters. This class examines diverse contexts of apprenticeship, where individuals undergo long-term, intensive training in situations of practice. CHDV Distribution: B, C (D. Ansari, Autumn)

24335. Introduction to Medical Anthropology and Critical Studies of Global Health. (=ANTH 24335, HIPS 24335, HLTH 24335) Ideas about health and the experience and interpretation of distress and illness are products of specific historical, social, economic, and cultural contexts. The physical body, however, constrains the shaping of these ideas. The aim of this course is to examine the way in which concepts about the body in health and in illness in any given society are reflections of specific kinds of social organization and political relations together with shared cultural values. The first module of the course will outline the major theoretical models for approaching the study of illness, health, and medicine, as objects of anthropological analysis. The second, third, and fourth modules of this course will variously examine historical, cultural, environmental, economic, and political considerations to provide a comprehensive global overview of the many factors that influence the health of individuals and populations. In each module we will explore specific themes, buttressed by ethnographic case studies: for example, medicine as a cultural system; different medical traditions; cross-cultural medicine; medicalization of the life-cycle; anthropology of the body; the social lives of medicines, reemerging infections, biomedical technologies; social suffering; and, finally, the political dimensions of health policy in the US and abroad. CHDV Distribution: D (P. Brotherton, Winter)

24341/40310. Topics in Medical Anthropololgy. (=ANTH 243431/40310) This seminar will review theoretical positions and debates in the burgeoning fields of medical anthropology and science and technology studies (STS). We will begin this seminar exploring how “disease” and “health” in the early 19-century became inseparable from political, economic, and technological imperatives. By highlighting the epistemological foundations of modern biology and medicine, the remainder of this seminar will then focus on major perspectives in, and responses to, critical studies of health and medicine, subjectivity and the body, entanglements of ecology and health, humanitarianism, and psychoanalytic anthropology. CHDV Distribution: D (S. Brotherton, Spring)

25002. Feminism, Race, Culture and Liberation. (=CRES 25002). Beginning in the twentieth century, a popular global discourse amongst some feminists, anthropologists, and human rights activists has become focused on liberating oppressed peoples from tyrannical systems of power, most often non-Western women of color from traditional patriarchies. However, oftentimes these well-intentioned movements toward liberation are incompatible with the lived realities of the oppressed, and, oftentimes, the “oppressed” are actually active agents in their own liberations. This course will explore what we mean when we discuss ideas of liberation and social acceptance through a gendered cultural lens, considering the foundations of contemporary feminism and human rights dialogues within different cultural and racial contexts. What and whom are we purportedly liberating with our liberal Western ideals, and what and whom are we failing to consider? Why are gender, sex, and sexuality emphasized to the degree they are, and how do differing emphases produce different sociocultural results? What moral exercises are necessary to most accurately understand the various central elements of a human cultural experience? Can individuals, including ourselves, ever truly be liberated from cultural contexts? CHDV Distribution: B, C (T. Mandviwala, Autumn)

25003. Mulitcultural Development and Gender. (= CRES 25003, GNSE 25003). This course will focus on gender scripts and performance as they are developed within multicultural contexts. We will focus on the mainstream and sub-cultures of the contemporary U.S. as the nation is both famously and infamously a place where individuals from multiple cultural backgrounds coexist. Traditionally, patriarchal norms have shaped many cultures worldwide, including American, so women’s and non-gender-conforming individuals’ experiences have been relegated to sub-culture status even for culturally mainstream (i.e., White) individuals. The subculture dynamic becomes even more charged when conflicting scripts of gender must be grappled with between cultures an individual is a member of; for example, for immigrants or people of color. In this course, we will take an intersectional approach to examining the lived experiences of individuals from multicultural backgrounds, pulling apart the multiple racial, cultural, and gendered elements that comprise their realities, shape their decision-making and identity development, and ultimately craft their life trajectories. CHDV Distribution: B, C (T. Mandviwala, Spring)

25120. Child Development and Public Policy. (=PBPL 25120, EDSO 25120, PSYC 25120) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the literature on early child development and explore how an understanding of core developmental concepts can inform social policies. This goal will be addressed through an integrated, multidisciplinary approach. The course will emphasize research on the science of early child development from the prenatal period through school entry. The central debate about the role of early experience in development will provide a unifying strand for the course. Students will be introduced to research in neuroscience, psychology, economics, sociology, and public policy as it bears on questions about “what develops?”, critical periods in development, the nature vs. nurture debate, and the ways in which environmental contexts (e.g., parents, families, peers, schools, institutions, communities) affect early development and developmental trajectories. The first part of the course will introduce students to the major disciplinary streams in the developmental sciences and the enduring and new debates and perspectives within the field. The second part will examine the multiple contexts of early development to understand which aspects of young children’s environments affect their development and how those impacts arise. Throughout the course, we will explore how the principles of early childhood development can guide the design of policies and practices that enhance the healthy development of young children. CHDV Distribution: B (A. Kalil, Winter)

25900. Introduction to Developmental Psychology. (=EDSO 20500, PSYC 20500) This is an introductory course in developmental psychology, with a focus on cognitive and social development in infancy through early childhood. Example topics include children's early thinking about number, morality, and social relationships, as well as how early environments inform children's social and cognitive development. Where appropriate, we make links to both philosophical inquiries into the nature of the human mind, and to practical inquiries concerning education and public policy. CHDV Distribution: B (K. O'Doherty, Spring)

26000/30600. Introduction to Social Psychology. (=PSYC 20600/30600) This  course examines social psychological theory and research based on both classic and contemporary contributions. Among the major topics examined are conformity and deviance, the attitude-change process, social role and personality, social cognition, and political psychology. (W. Goldstein, Autumn).

26206. Self in Contexts: Being and Becoming in Social Interaction. This course critically engages the differential relations of self to the sociohistorical, cultural and interactional contexts in a neoliberal, rapidly globalizing and increasingly diverse world. CHDV Distribution: C (S. Numanbayraktaroglu, Winter)

27860/37860. History of Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences. ( =CHSS 37860, HIPS 27860, HLTH 27860, KNOW 27860) This course will consist of lectures and discussion sessions about the historical and conceptual foundations of evolutionary behavioral sciences (evolutionary anthropology, evolutionary psychology, ethology, comparative behavioral biology), covering the period from the publication of Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species up to the present day. Topics will include new theoretical developments, controversies, interdisciplinary expansions, and the relationships between evolutionary behavioral sciences and other disciplines in the sciences and the humanities.  CHDV Distribution: A, 1* (D. Maestripieri, Autumn)

27861/37861. Darwinism and Literature. (=CHSS 34921, HIPS 24921, HIST 24921/34921, KNOW 21418/31418, ). In this course we will explore the notion that literary fiction can contribute to the generation of new knowledge of the human mind, human behavior, and human societies. Some novelists in the late 19th and early 20th century provided fictional portrayals of human nature that were grounded into Darwinian theory. These novelists operated within the conceptual framework of the complementarity of science and literature advanced by Goethe and the other romantics. At a time when novels became highly introspective and psychological, these writers used their literary craftsmanship to explore and illustrate universals aspects of human nature. In this course we read the work of several novelists such as George Eliot, HG Wells, Joseph Conrad, Jack London, Yuvgeny Zamyatin, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Italo Svevo, and Elias Canetti, and discuss how these authors anticipated the discoveries made decades later by cognitive, social, and evolutionary psychology. CHDV Distribution: A, 1* (D. Maestripieri, R. Richards, Autumn)

28301. Disability and Design. (=BPRO 28300, HLTH 28301, MAAD 28300, MUSI 25719) Disability is often an afterthought, an unexpected tragedy to be mitigated, accommodated, or overcome. In cultural, political, and educational spheres, disabilities are non-normative, marginal, even invisible. This runs counter to many of our lived experiences of difference where, in fact, disabilities of all kinds are the "new normal." In this interdisciplinary course, we center both the category and experience of disability. Moreover, we consider the stakes of explicitly designing for different kinds of bodies and minds. Rather than approaching disability as a problem to be accommodated, we consider the affordances that disability offers for design. This course begins by situating us in the growing discipline of Disability Studies and the activist (and intersectional) Disability Justice movement. We then move to four two-week units in specific areas where disability meets design: architecture, infrastructure, and public space; education and the classroom; economics, employment, and public policy; and aesthetics. Traversing from architecture to art, and from education to economic policy, this course asks how we can design for access. CHDV Distribution: C (M. Friedner, J. Iverson, Winter)

29700. Readings and Research in Human Development. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Available for quality grades or for P/F grades. (Select section from faculty list on web, all quarters).

29800. BA Honors Seminar. Required for students seeking honors in Human Development. This seminar is designed to help students develop an honors paper to be submitted for approval and supervised by a CHDV faculty member. A course preceptor provides guidance through the process of research design and proposal writing. (K. Robbins, Spring)

29900. Honors Paper Preparation. Prerequisites: PQ: CHDV 29800 and an approved honors project. To complete work on their Honors Papers, students must register for this course with their faculty supervisor, normally in the quarter preceding the one in which they expect to graduate. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. The grade assigned to the Honors Paper will become the grade of record for this course. (Select Faculty from List, Autumn).

Graduate 

Course Areas

1. Comparative Behavioral Biology

2. Society, Institutions, Culture and the Life Course

3. Cultural Psychology, Psychological Anthropology, Immigration Studies

4. Health, Vulnerability and Culture

5. Language and Communication in Thought and Interaction

M. Methods

 

30102. Introduction to Causal Inference. (=MACS 5100, PBHS 43201, PLSC 30102, SOCI 30315, STAT 31900). PQ: Intermediate Statistics or equivalent such as STAT 224/PBHS 324, PP 31301, BUS 41100, or SOC 30005. This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from the social sciences, education, public health science, public policy, social service administration, and statistics who are involved in quantitative research and are interested in studying causality. The goal of this course is to equip students with basic knowledge of and analytic skills in causal inference. Topics for the course will include the potential outcomes framework for causal inference; experimental and observational studies; identification assumptions for causal parameters; potential pitfalls of using ANCOVA to estimate a causal effect; propensity score based methods including matching, stratification, inverse-probability-of-treatment-weighting (IPTW), marginal mean weighting through stratification (MMWS), and doubly robust estimation; sensitivity analysis; the instrumental variable (IV) method; regression discontinuity design (RDD) including sharp RDD and fuzzy RDD; difference in difference (DID) and generalized DID methods for cross-sectional and panel data, and fixed effects model. Intermediate Statistics or equivalent such as STAT 224/PBHS 324, PP 31301, BUS 41100, or SOC 30005 is a prerequisite. This course is a pre-requisite for “Advanced Topics in Causal Inference” and “Mediation, moderation, and spillover effects.” CHDV Distribution: M* (G. Hong, K. Yamaguchi, Winter)

30510. Computational Context Analysis. (=MACS 60000, SOCI 40133)A vast expanse of information about what people do, know, think, and feel lies embedded in text, and more of the contemporary social world lives natively within electronic text than ever before. These textual traces range from collective activity on the web, social media, instant messaging and automatically transcribed YouTube videos to online transactions, medical records, digitized libraries and government intelligence. This supply of text has elicited demand for natural language processing and machine learning tools to filter, search, and translate text into valuable data. The course will survey and practically apply many of the most exciting computational approaches to text analysis, highlighting both supervised methods that extend old theories to new data and unsupervised techniques that discover hidden regularities worth theorizing. These will be examined and evaluated on their own merits, and relative to the validity and reliability concerns of classical content analysis, the interpretive concerns of qualitative content analysis, and the interactional concerns of conversation analysis. We will also consider how these approaches can be adapted to content beyond text, including audio, images, and video. We will simultaneously review recent research that uses these approaches to develop social insight by exploring (a) collective attention and reasoning through the content of communication; (b) social relationships through the process of communication; and (c) social state. CHDV Distribution: M* (J. Evans, Winter)

30511. Computing for the Social Sciences. (=ENST 20550, MACS 20500, MAPS 30500, PLSC 30235, SOCI 20278, SOCI 40176) This is an applied course for social scientists with little-to-no programming experience who wish to harness growing digital and computational resources. The focus of the course is on generating reproducible research through the use of programming languages and version control software. Major emphasis is placed on a pragmatic understanding of core principles of programming and packaged implementations of methods. Students will leave the course with basic computational skills implemented through many computational methods and approaches to social science; while students will not become expert programmers, they will gain the knowledge of how to adapt and expand these skills as they are presented with new questions, methods, and data. More information can be found at https://cfss.uchicago.edu CHDV Distribution: M* (B. Soltoff, Autumn)

30901. Biopsychology of Sex Differences. (=PSYC 31600, EVOL 36900, GNSE 30901) This course will explore the biological basis of mammalian sex differences and reproductive behaviors. We will consider a variety of species, including humans.  We will address the physiological, hormonal, ecological and social basis of sex differences. To get the most from this course, students should have some background in biology, preferably from taking an introductory course in biology or biological psychology. CHDV Distribution: A, 1* (J. Mateo, Autumn)

31000/21000 Cultural Psychology.  (=PSYC 23000/33000, ANTH 24320/35110, GNSE 21001/31000, AMER 33000) PQ: Third or fourth year standing. There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space.  At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world.  Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups.  In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization and reasoning. CHDV Distribution: B, C; 2*, 3* (R. Shweder, Autumn).

22103/32103. Feminisms & Anthropology (=ANTH 25211/32910, GNSE 22103/32103)  P.Q. Advanced undergraduates (3rd or 4th year); assumes Background From Self, Culture and Society or Equivalent.  This seminar examines the somewhat fraught yet generative relation between various movements of feminism and the discipline of anthropology.  Both feminism(s) and anthropology emerged in the 19th century as fields invested in thinking “the human” through questions of alterity or Otherness. As such, feminist and anthropological inquiries often take up shared objects of analysis—including nature/culture, kinship, the body, sexuality, exchange, value and power—even as they differ in their political and scholarly orientations through the last century and a half.  Tracking the emergence of feminisms and anthropology as distinct fields of academic discourse on the one hand and political intervention on the Other, we will pursue the following lines of inquiry: 1) a genealogical approach to examine key concepts and problem-spaces forged at the intersection of these two fields 2) critical analysis of the relation of feminist and postcolonial social movements to the professionalizing fields of knowledge production ( including Marxist inspired writing on women and economy, Third World feminism and intersectionality, and feminist critiques of science studies)  and 3) a reflexive contemporary examination of the way these two strands of thought have come together in the subfield of feminist anthropology and the continual frictions and resonances of feminist and anthropological approaches in academic settings and in the larger world (e.g., #MeToo, sex positive activism, queer politics, feminist economics, etc.).  Distribution: C, 2, 3 (J. Cole, J. Chu, Winter)

32401. Multilevel Modeling. (=PBHS 33400) PQ: PBHS 32400 and PBHS 32700 or consent of instructor. This course will focus on the analysis of multilevel data in which subjects are nested within clusters (e.g., health care providers, hospitals). The focus will be on clustered data, and several extensions to the basic two-level multilevel model will be considered including three-level, cross-classified, multiple membership, and multivariate models. In addition to models for continuous outcomes, methods for non-normal outcomes will be covered, including multilevel models for dichotomous, ordinal, nominal, time-to-event, and count outcomes. Some statistical theory will be given, but the focus will be on application and interpretation of the statistical analyses. CHDV Distribution: M (D. Hedeker, Autumn)

32501. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis. (=PBHS 33000, STAT 36900) PQ: PBHS 32400/STAT 22400 or equivalent, and PBHS 32600/STAT 22600 or PBHS 32700/STAT 22700 or equivalent; orconsent of instructor. Longitudinal data consist of multiple measures over time on a sample of individuals. This type of data occurs extensively in both observational and experimental biomedical and public health studies, as well as in studies in sociology and applied economics. This course will provide an introduction to the principles and methods for the analysis of longitudinal data. Whereas some supporting statistical theory will be given, emphasis will be on data analysis and interpretation of models for longitudinal data. Problems will be motivated by applications in epidemiology, clinical medicine, health services research, and disease natural history studies. CHDV Distribution: M (D. Hodeker, Spring)

32702. Statistical Applications. (=PBHS 33500, STAT 35800) PQ: PBHS 32700/STAT 22700 or STAT 34700 or consent of instructor. This course provides a transition between statistical theory and practice.  The course will cover statistical applications in medicine, mental health, environmental science, analytical chemistry, and public policy.  Lectures are oriented around specific examples from a variety of content areas.  Opportunities for the class to work on interesting applied problems presented by U of C faculty will be provided.  Although an overview of relevant statistical theory will be presented, emphasis is on the development of statistical solutions to interesting applied problems. CHDV Distribution: M (R. Gibbons, Autumn)

33301. Culture, Mental Health and Psychiatry. (=ANTH 24315/ANTH 35115, =HIPS 27302, = HLTH 2330) PQ: Undergraduates must have previously completed a SOSC sequence. While mental illness has recently been framed in largely neurobiological terms as “brain disease,” there has also been an increasing awareness of the contingency of psychiatric diagnoses.  In this course, we will draw upon readings from medical and psychological anthropology, cultural psychiatry, and science studies to examine this paradox and to examine mental health and illness as a set of subjective experiences, social processes and objects of knowledge and intervention. On a conceptual level, the course invites students to think through the complex relationships between categories of knowledge and clinical technologies (in this case, mainly psychiatric ones) and the subjectivities of persons living with mental illness.  Put in slightly different terms, we will look at the multiple links between psychiatrists’ professional accounts of mental illness and patients' experiences of it. Questions explored include: Does mental illness vary across social and cultural settings?  How are experiences of people suffering from mental illness shaped by psychiatry’s knowledge of their afflictions? CHDV Distribution: C, D, 3*,4* (E. Raikhel, Autumn)

33305Critical Studies of Mental Health in Higher Education. PQ: Registration by instructor consent only. This course draws on a range of perspectives from across the interpretive, critical, and humanistic social sciences to examine the issues of mental health, illness, and distress in higher education. CHDV Distribution: D, 4* (E. Raikhel, Winter)

34501. Anthropology of Museums-1. (=ANTH 24510/34510, MAPH 34400, MAPS 34500, SOSC 34500) Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums. CHDV Distribution: 3* (F. Morris, Autumn)

34710. In Conversation with Language and Culture. (=MAPS 34700) This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary class that explores research in early cognitive development within the field of language, culture and the self. We will discuss a variety of topics in cognitive development, as well as important questions concerning language and culture. This course will touch upon on research across development to document early biases in human reasoning that might persist through the lifespan, and will emphasize how we can use basic science research to inform educational goals and make positive contributions to addressing issues related to language and culture. CHDV Distribution: 5* (P. Fan, Spring)

36008. Principles and Methods of Measurement. PQ: Course work or background experience in statistics through inferential statistics and linear regression.The course is designed to provide theoretical principles of measurement that are applicable to both teaching and research in social and behavioral sciences. Part of the course will be devoted to current issues in measurement and to practical applications to these principles. Considerable attention will be directed toward understanding basic psychometric concepts, including topic of scaling, classical test theory and its approach to test reliability, generalizability theory and its approach to test reliability, principles and procedures for investigating test validity, statistical issues of using tests for selection and classification, and approaches to item analysis including item response theory. CHDV Distribution: M (Y. Sheng, Spring)

36655. Advanced Topics in Epigenetics in the Brain. (=PSYC 36655) PQ: Only fourth-year college students with permission. Once considered a domain of cancer, we now recognize that epigenetic processes affect neurodevelopment, cognitive processes, mental disorders, and behavior. Epigenetic mechanisms are those that alter the function of the genome without altering the base sequence of genomic DNA (the As, Cs, Ts, and Gs we are familiar with), thus can be flexibly modified in response to the environment. In this seminar, we will explore a variety of epigenetic modifications, consider how they encode personal and transgenerational experiences, and examine how they direct brain function and behavior. Behavior can be understood on multiple levels and timescales; we will employ knowledge from the emerging field of epigenetics to shed more light into the black box of behavior. CHDV Distribution: 1* (S. London, Winter)

37201. Language in Culture-I. (=ANTH 37201, LING 31100, PSYC 47001) Among topics discussed in the first half of the sequence are the formal structure of semiotic systems, the ethnographically crucial incorporation of linguistic forms into cultural systems, and the methods for empirical investigation of “functional” semiotic structure and history. CHDV Distribution: 5* (M. Silverstein, Autumn)

37202. Language in Culture-II. (=ANTH 37202, LING 31200, PSYC 47002) The second half of the sequence takes up basic concepts in sociolinguistics and their critique. CHDV Distribution: 5*(S. Gal, Winter)

37861. Darwinism and Literature. (=CHSS 34921, HIPS 24921, HIST 24921, HIST 34921, KNOW 21418, KNOW 31418) In this course we will explore the notion that literary fiction can contribute to the generation of new knowledge of the human mind, human behavior, and human societies. Some novelists in the late 19th and early 20th century provided fictional portrayals of human nature that were grounded into Darwinian theory. These novelists operated within the conceptual framework of the complementarity of science and literature advanced by Goethe and the other romantics. At a time when novels became highly introspective and psychological, these writers used their literary craftsmanship to explore and illustrate universals aspects of human nature. In this course we read the work of several novelists such as George Eliot, HG Wells, Joseph Conrad, Jack London, Yuvgeny Zamyatin, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Italo Svevo, and Elias Canetti, and discuss how these authors anticipated the discoveries made decades later by cognitive, social, and evolutionary psychology. CHDV Distribution: A, 1* (D. Maestripieri and R. Richards)

38950. The Development of Communicative Competence. This course examines the emergence of communicative skills in humans. We will focus on how children glean information about language structure and language use from their home environments. We will also discuss the proposed cognitive and evolutionary roots of communicative behaviors, with a focus on current gaps in our knowledge and possible pathways forward. The course will consider these issues from multiple perspectives including linguistics, psychology, and linguistic anthropology. We will also briefly cover a range of methods associated with these different areas of study. It is expected that, by the end of the course, you should be able to think and write critically about how human communication and human language are intertwined in both adults and children. CHDV Distribution: 5* (M. Casillas, Spring)

38990. Muslims in the United States and Western Europe. (=CRES 38990) Muslim migration to the United States and Western Europe proliferated in the last quarter of the 20th Century, and Islam has been a visible (and controversial) presence in these societies ever since. Though internally varied by race, ethnicity, national origins, sect and class positionality, Muslim communities have faced homogenizing narratives rooted in orientalist frameworks. As Islam continues to be a site of conflict in geopolitical struggles, these frameworks have reproduced themselves into the twenty-first century. This course will use an intersectional and critical lens to examine the issues facing Muslims in the United States and Western Europe on both macro and micro levels. One third of the course will cover the interactions between Muslim communities and their “host societies” vis-à-vis the state, mass media, and public opinion. Another third of the course will delve into issues of socioeconomic mobility and cultural assimilation, Finally, the last third will show how these macro concepts influence the everyday lived experiences of Muslims in these contexts. This is a seminar-style, reading-heavy course. Students should be familiar with and capable of deploying the sociological concepts of race, class, gender and intersectionality. CHDV Distribution: B, C, 2*, 3* (E. Abdelhadi, Spring).

39900. Readings in Human Development. PQ: Permission of instructor. This course is often taken with the student's advisor in preparation for their thesis proposal. (Select section from faculty list, all quarters).

40000. HD Concepts. (=PSYC 40900) PQ: CHD graduate students only. Our assumptions about the processes underlying development shape how we read the literature, design studies, and interpret results.  The purpose of this course is two-fold in that, first, it makes explicit both our own assumptions as well as commonly held philosophical perspectives that impact the ways in which human development is understood. Second, the course provides an overview of theories and domain-specific perspectives related to individual development across the life-course.  The emphasis is on issues and questions that have dominated the field over time and, which continue to provide impetus for research, its interpretation, and the character of policy decisions and their implementation. Stated differently, theories have utility and are powerful tools. Accordingly, the course provides a broad basis for appreciating theoretical approaches to the study of development and for understanding the use of theory in the design of research and its application. Most significant, theories represent heuristic devices for "real time" interpretations of daily experiences and broad media disseminated messages. CHDV Distribution: R (J. Lucy, Autumn).

40192. Seminar: The Family. (=SOCI 40192) This seminar will focus on classic and current readings on the family, including the family as an institution, changes in family structure and function, new family forms, cohabitation, marriage, union dissolution, fertility, sexuality, working families, intergenerational relations, and family policy. We will discuss the readings for the week, with a focus on evaluating both the research and the ideas. Students will develop a research project on the family and prepare a paper outlining the project, providing a theoretical framework, background, hypotheses and approach. This might serve as the basis for a qualifying paper. CHDV Distribution: 2* (L. Waite, Autumn)

40207. Development in Adolescents. (=CRES 40207). Adolescence represents a period of unusually rapid growth and development. At the same time, under the best of social circumstances and contextual conditions, the teenage years represent a challenging period. The period also affords unparalleled opportunities with appropriate levels of support. Thus, the approach taken acknowledges the challenges and untoward outcomes, while also speculates about the predictors of resiliency and the sources of positive youth development.  The perspective taken unpacks the developmental period's complexity as exacerbated by the many contextual and cultural forces which are often made worse by unacknowledged socially structured conditions, which interact with youths' unavoidable and unique meaning making processes. As a fuction of  some youths' privileging situations versus the low resource and chronic conditions of others, both coping processes and identity formation processes are emphasized as highly consequential. Thus, stage specific developmental processes are explored for understanding gap findings for a society's diverse youth. In sum, the course presents the experiences of diverse youth from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The strategy improves our understanding about the "what" of human development as well as the "how." Ultimately, the conceptual orientation described is critical for 1) designing better social policy, 2) improving  the training and support of socializing agents (e.g., teachers), and 3) enhancing human developmental outcomes (e.g., resilient patterns). CHDV Distribution: 2* (M.B. Spencer, Autumn)

40310. Topics in Medical Anthropology. (=ANTH 40310). This seminar will review theoretical positions and debates in the burgeoning fields of medical anthropology and science and technology studies (STS). We will begin this seminar exploring how “disease” and “health” in the early 19-century became inseparable from political, economic, and technological imperatives. By highlighting the epistemological foundations of modern biology and medicine, the remainder of this seminar will then focus on major perspectives in, and responses to, critical studies of health and medicine, subjectivity and the body, entanglements of ecology and health, humanitarianism, and psychoanalytic anthropology. CHDV Distribution: 4* (S. Brotherton, Spring)

40404. Computation and Identification of Cultural Patterns. (=MACS 40404, MAPS 40401, PSYC 40460) Culture is increasingly becoming digital, making it more and more necessary for those in both academia and industry to use computational strategies to effectively identify, understand, and (in the case of industry) capitalize on emerging cultural patterns. In this course, students will explore interdisciplinary approaches for defining and mobilizing the concept of “culture” in their computational analyses, drawing on relevant literature from the fields of Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology. Additionally, they will receive hands-on experience applying computational approaches to identify and analyze a wide range of cultural patterns using the Python programming language. For instance, students will learn to identify emerging social movements using social media data, predict the next fashion trends, and even decipher ancient symbols using archaeological databases. No previous coding experience required. A Python boot camp will be held at the beginning of the quarter to teach the coding skills necessary to succeed in the course. Open to Advanced Undergraduates with Instructor Permission. CHDV Distribution Area M* (J. Clindaniel, Autumn)

40770. Early Childhood: Human Capital Development and Public Policy. (=PPHA 40700, PSYC 40710, This course is designed to provide an overview of current policy issues involving children and families, and will emphasize the scientific perspective of developmental psychology. The following topics will be addressed: family structure and child development, the role of the father in children's lives, poverty and family processes, maternal employment and child care, adolescent parenthood, neighborhood influences on families, and welfare reform. Theoretical perspectives and measurements, (e.g., the tools of the science), regarding how children develop from infancy to adulthood, will be stressed. (A. Kalil, Winter)

40853. Topics in Developmental Psychology. (=PSYC 40853) Brown-bag discussion of current research in psychology. (A. Shaw)

40900. Behavioral Ecology. (=EVOL 40900) This graduate seminar will explore current advances of animal social behaviors in their natural contexts, including theoretical and methodological approaches. Format will include reading and analysis of empirical and review articles, as well as an oral presentation on a topic of interest to the student. CHDV Distribution 1*. (J. Mateo, Winter)

41603. Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology. (=PSYC 40500) This is an introductory course for graduate students in developmental psychology. Topics in biological, perceptual, cognitive, social, and language development will be covered. This course will satisfy one of Psychology graduate students’ core course requirements. CHDV Distribution: 2* (S. Levine and A. Shaw)

41920. The Evolution of Language. How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern “fossils” in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more. CHDV DIstribution: 5* (S. Mufwene, Spring)

42350. Development Over the Life Course. (=SSAD 50400) This course explores the biological and social patterning of lives from infancy through old age. Readings will include class and contemporary theory and research related to varied stages of the life course. Discussion will focus on paradigmatic themes in life course development such as: the social situation of lives in time and place, the interconnectedness of lives and generations, the nature of developmental transitions, the timing of life experiences, and the continuity of lives through time. Examples will be drawn from populations of traditional concern within social welfare policy and social work practice. CHDV Distribution: 2* (S. Hans, Spring)

42401. Trial Research in Human Development -I. PQ: CHD grad students only. This course is taken in the Spring quarter of the first year, and again in the Autumn quarter of the second year.  The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects. CHDV Distribution: R (M. Friedner, Spring)

42402. Trial Research in Human Development -II. PQ: CHD grad students only. This course is taken in the Autumn quarter of the second year.  The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects. CHDV Distribution: R (R. Shweder, Autumn)

43600Processes of Judgement and Decision Making. (=PSYC 43600) This course offers a survey of research on judgment and decision making, with emphasis placed on uncertainty and (intrapersonal) conflict.  An historical approach is taken in which the roots of current research issues and practices are traced.  Topics are drawn from the following areas: evaluation and choice when goals are in conflict and must be traded off, decision making when consequences of the decision are uncertain, predictive and evaluative judgments under conditions of uncertain, incomplete, conflicting, or otherwise fallible information. CHDV Distribution: No Area (B. Goldstein, Autumn)

43660. Research Topics in Gesture and Learning I. This course will explore how actions, particularly actions that are used to represent (i.e., gestures), can be used to promote learning in hearing and deaf learners.  The course will also explore how gesture (hands used to convey information in a non-codified way) can be distinguished from sign language (hands used to convey information in a codified, linguistic way) at one level, and from action (hands used to manipulate objects and thus change the world in a direct way) at another level.  Mechanisms underlying these effects will also be explored; for example, how the hands direct attention and are processed in the brain during learning situations; how the hands change as they become more codified in an emerging language. (S. Goldin-Meadow, Winter)

43661. Research Topics in Gesture and Learning II. This course will explore how actions, particularly actions that are used to represent (i.e., gestures), can be used to promote learning in hearing and deaf learners.  The course will also explore how gesture (hands used to convey information in a non-codified way) can be distinguished from sign language (hands used to convey information in a codified, linguistic way) at one level, and from action (hands used to manipulate objects and thus change the world in a direct way) at another level.  Mechanisms underlying these effects will also be explored; for example, how the hands direct attention and are processed in the brain during learning situations; how the hands change as they become more codified in an emerging language. Permission of instructor required. (S. Goldin-Meadow, Spring)

43680. Topics in Language and Gesture. (=PSYC 43680) The course will focus on a range of topics in language (discourse, narrative, turn-taking, conversational repair, etc.) and how they interact with co-speech and other nonverbal cues. CHDV Distribution: 5* (S. Goldin-Meadow, Winter)

43690. Topics in Action, Representation, and Gesture. (=PSYC 43690) The course will focus on how movement of the body (including gesture) affects learning, information processing, and representation. CHDV Distribution: 5* (S. Goldin-Meadow, Spring)

45100. Anthropology of the Body. (=ANTH 45125, CHSS 45125, GNSE 45112) Drawing on a wide and interdisciplinary range of texts, both classic and more recent, this seminar will variously examine the theoretical debates of the body as a subject of anthropological, historical, psychological, medical and literary inquiry. The seminar will explore specific themes, for example, the persistence of the mind/body dualism, experiences of embodiment/alienation, phenomenology of the body, Foucauldian notions of bio-politics, bio- power and the ethic of the self, and the medicalized, gendered, and racialized body, among other salient themes.This seminar is a collaborative exercise that is only as good as the contribution of each participant. Attendance, preparation, and participation are essential to the quality of everyone’s seminar experience. In this seminar, the assigned readings correspond to the general theme of the week’s seminar. The weekly session is organized as follows: during the first hour, two students will participate in co-leading a critical discussion of the required readings for that day. We will then take a short break, and the remainder of the class will be a general lecture and discussion fleshing out the major debates and significance of the week’s theme. CHDV Distribution: 4* (S. Brotherton, Winter)

45401. The Anthropology of Disability. (=ANTH 45121) What is disability as a category and experience and how do we study it conceptually and methodologically? Disability cuts across age, gender, class, caste, occupation, religion- or does it? In this course, we critically examine both the experiences of people with disabilities in a global context as well as the politics and processes of writing about such experiences. In the beginning of the course, we will develop a foundation from which to talk about local and global contexts as well as disability. We will consider issues of development, globalization, and transnationalism. We will ask whether disability is a universal category and we will consider how experiences of health, illness, disability, and debility vary. We will engage in “concept work” by analyzing the relationships between disability and impairment and we will critically evaluate the different models employed to think about disability. We will read both foundational disability studies texts and ethnographic work. CHDV Distribution: 3*, 4* (M. Friedner, Spring)

45699. When Cultures Colide: Muticulturalism in Liberal Democracies. (=ANTH 45600, GNSE 45600, HMRT 35600, KNOW 45699, PSYC 45300) PQ:Advanced undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor. Coming to terms with diversity in an increasingly multicultural world has become one of the most pressing public policy projects for liberal democracies in the early 21st century. One way to come to terms with diversity is to try to understand the scope and limits of toleration for variety at different national sites where immigration from foreign lands has complicated the cultural landscape. This seminar  examines a series of legal and moral questions about the proper response to norm conflict between mainstream populations and cultural minority groups (including old and new immigrants), with special reference to court cases that have arisen in the recent history of the United States. CHDV Distribution: 3* (R. Shweder, Winter)

47300. Linguistic Anthropology Practicum. (=ANTH 57300) Linguistic Anthropology Practicum / Projects in the Linguistics Laboratory. (C. Nakassis, Spring)

48002. Mind and Biology Proseminar 2. (=PSYC 48002) Seminar series at the Institute for Mind and Biology meets three to four times per quarter. Sign up for three quarters; receive credit at the end of Spring Quarter. (S. Shevell, Winter)

48003. Mind and Biology Proseminar 3. (=PSYC 48003) Seminar series at the Institute for Mind and Biology meets three to four times per quarter. Sign up for three quarters; receive credit at the end of Spring Quarter. (S. Shevell, Spring)

48412. Publications, Grants, and the Academic Job Market. (=PSYC 48142) In this graduate seminar we will discuss how to write and publish scientific articles, prepare grant applications, write CVs and job applications, and give job talks and interviews. In other words, everything you always wanted to know about being successful in academia but were afraid to ask. (D. Maestripieri, Autumn)

49900. Research in Human Development. PQ. Permission of instructor. This course is often taken with the student's advisor in preparation for their dissertation. (Select faculty from section list, all quarters.)